Candidemia in the critically ill: Initial therapy and outcome in mechanically ventilated patients

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9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Mortality among critically ill patients with candidemia is very high. We sought to determine whether the choice of initial antifungal therapy is associated with survival among these patients, using need for mechanical ventilatory support as a marker of critical illness.Methods: Cohort analysis of outcomes among mechanically ventilated patients with candidemia from the 24 North American academic medical centers contributing to the Prospective Antifungal Therapy (PATH) Alliance registry. Patients were included if they received either fluconazole or an echinocandin as initial monotherapy.Results: Of 5272 patients in the PATH registry at the time of data abstraction, 1014 were ventilated and concomitantly had candidemia, with 689 eligible for analysis. 28-day survival was higher among the 374 patients treated initially with fluconazole than among the 315 treated with an echinocandin (66% versus 51%, P < .001). Initial fluconazole therapy remained associated with improved survival after adjusting for non-treatment factors in the overall population (hazard ratio .75, 95% CI .59-96), and also among patients with albicans infection (hazard ratio .62, 95% CI .44-88). While not statistically significant, fluconazole appeared to be associated with higher mortality among patients infected with glabrata (HR 1.13, 95% CI .70-1.84).Conclusions: Among ventilated patients with candidemia, those receiving fluconazole as initial monotherapy were significantly more likely to survive than those treated with an echinocandin. This difference persisted after adjustment for non-treatment factors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number37
JournalBMC Anesthesiology
Volume13
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 30 2013

Keywords

  • Azoles
  • Candidemia
  • Echinocandins
  • Intensive care
  • Mechanical ventilation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

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