Cancer incidence in first generation U.S. Hispanics: Cubans, Mexicans, Puerto Ricans, and New Latinos

Paulo Pinheiro, Recinda L. Sherman, Edward J. Trapido, Lora E. Fleming, Youjie Huang, Orlando W Gomez-Marin, David J Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

107 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background:The diversity among Hispanics/Latinos, defined by geographic origin (e.g., Mexico, Puerto Rico, Cuba), has been neglected when assessing cancer morbidity. For the first time in the United States, we estimated cancer rates for Cubans, Mexicans, Puerto Ricans, and other Latinos, and analyzed changes in cancer risk between Hispanics in their countries of origin, U.S. Hispanics in Florida, and non-Hispanic Whites in Florida. Methods: Florida cancer registry (1999-2001) and the 2000 U.S. Census population data were used. The Hispanic Origin Identification Algorithm was applied to establish Hispanic ethnicity and subpopulation. Results: The cancer rate of 537/100,000 person-years (95% confidence interval, 522.5-552.5) for Hispanic males in Florida was lower than Whites (601; 595.4-606.9). Among women, these rates were 376 (365.6-387.1) and 460 (455.6-465.4), respectively. Among Florida Hispanics, Puerto Ricans had the highest rates, followed by Cubans. Mexicans had the lowest rates. Rates for Hispanics in Florida were at least 40% higher than Hispanics in their countries of origin, as reported by the IARC. Conclusion: Substantial variability in cancer rates occurs among Hispanic subpopulations. Cubans, unlike other Hispanics, were comparable with Whites, especially for low rates of cervical and stomach cancers. Despite being overwhelmingly first generation in the U.S. mainland, Puerto Ricans and Cubans in Florida showed rates of colorectal, endometrial, and prostate cancers similar to Whites in Florida. Because rates are markedly lower in their countries of origin, the increased risk for cancer among Cubans, Mexicans, and Puerto Ricans who move to the United States should be further studied.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2162-2169
Number of pages8
JournalCancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention
Volume18
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2009

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Hispanic Americans
Incidence
Neoplasms
Puerto Rico
Cuba
Censuses
Endometrial Neoplasms
Mexico
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
Stomach Neoplasms
Registries
Colorectal Neoplasms
Prostatic Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Oncology

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Cancer incidence in first generation U.S. Hispanics : Cubans, Mexicans, Puerto Ricans, and New Latinos. / Pinheiro, Paulo; Sherman, Recinda L.; Trapido, Edward J.; Fleming, Lora E.; Huang, Youjie; Gomez-Marin, Orlando W; Lee, David J.

In: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, Vol. 18, No. 8, 01.08.2009, p. 2162-2169.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pinheiro, Paulo ; Sherman, Recinda L. ; Trapido, Edward J. ; Fleming, Lora E. ; Huang, Youjie ; Gomez-Marin, Orlando W ; Lee, David J. / Cancer incidence in first generation U.S. Hispanics : Cubans, Mexicans, Puerto Ricans, and New Latinos. In: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention. 2009 ; Vol. 18, No. 8. pp. 2162-2169.
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abstract = "Background:The diversity among Hispanics/Latinos, defined by geographic origin (e.g., Mexico, Puerto Rico, Cuba), has been neglected when assessing cancer morbidity. For the first time in the United States, we estimated cancer rates for Cubans, Mexicans, Puerto Ricans, and other Latinos, and analyzed changes in cancer risk between Hispanics in their countries of origin, U.S. Hispanics in Florida, and non-Hispanic Whites in Florida. Methods: Florida cancer registry (1999-2001) and the 2000 U.S. Census population data were used. The Hispanic Origin Identification Algorithm was applied to establish Hispanic ethnicity and subpopulation. Results: The cancer rate of 537/100,000 person-years (95{\%} confidence interval, 522.5-552.5) for Hispanic males in Florida was lower than Whites (601; 595.4-606.9). Among women, these rates were 376 (365.6-387.1) and 460 (455.6-465.4), respectively. Among Florida Hispanics, Puerto Ricans had the highest rates, followed by Cubans. Mexicans had the lowest rates. Rates for Hispanics in Florida were at least 40{\%} higher than Hispanics in their countries of origin, as reported by the IARC. Conclusion: Substantial variability in cancer rates occurs among Hispanic subpopulations. Cubans, unlike other Hispanics, were comparable with Whites, especially for low rates of cervical and stomach cancers. Despite being overwhelmingly first generation in the U.S. mainland, Puerto Ricans and Cubans in Florida showed rates of colorectal, endometrial, and prostate cancers similar to Whites in Florida. Because rates are markedly lower in their countries of origin, the increased risk for cancer among Cubans, Mexicans, and Puerto Ricans who move to the United States should be further studied.",
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T1 - Cancer incidence in first generation U.S. Hispanics

T2 - Cubans, Mexicans, Puerto Ricans, and New Latinos

AU - Pinheiro, Paulo

AU - Sherman, Recinda L.

AU - Trapido, Edward J.

AU - Fleming, Lora E.

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AU - Gomez-Marin, Orlando W

AU - Lee, David J

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AB - Background:The diversity among Hispanics/Latinos, defined by geographic origin (e.g., Mexico, Puerto Rico, Cuba), has been neglected when assessing cancer morbidity. For the first time in the United States, we estimated cancer rates for Cubans, Mexicans, Puerto Ricans, and other Latinos, and analyzed changes in cancer risk between Hispanics in their countries of origin, U.S. Hispanics in Florida, and non-Hispanic Whites in Florida. Methods: Florida cancer registry (1999-2001) and the 2000 U.S. Census population data were used. The Hispanic Origin Identification Algorithm was applied to establish Hispanic ethnicity and subpopulation. Results: The cancer rate of 537/100,000 person-years (95% confidence interval, 522.5-552.5) for Hispanic males in Florida was lower than Whites (601; 595.4-606.9). Among women, these rates were 376 (365.6-387.1) and 460 (455.6-465.4), respectively. Among Florida Hispanics, Puerto Ricans had the highest rates, followed by Cubans. Mexicans had the lowest rates. Rates for Hispanics in Florida were at least 40% higher than Hispanics in their countries of origin, as reported by the IARC. Conclusion: Substantial variability in cancer rates occurs among Hispanic subpopulations. Cubans, unlike other Hispanics, were comparable with Whites, especially for low rates of cervical and stomach cancers. Despite being overwhelmingly first generation in the U.S. mainland, Puerto Ricans and Cubans in Florida showed rates of colorectal, endometrial, and prostate cancers similar to Whites in Florida. Because rates are markedly lower in their countries of origin, the increased risk for cancer among Cubans, Mexicans, and Puerto Ricans who move to the United States should be further studied.

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