Can surgeons evaluate emergency ultrasound scans for blunt abdominal trauma?

Mark G. McKenney, K. L. McKenney, R. P. Compton, Nicholas Namias, L. Fernandez, D. Levi, A. Arrillaga, Mauricio Lynn, L. Martin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

41 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To determine whether surgeons and residents with minimal training can evaluate accurately emergency ultrasound (US) examinations compared with radiologists for blunt abdominal trauma. Methods: Over 7 months, we conducted a prospective study comparing the evaluation of emergency US for blunt abdominal trauma by surgeons and attending radiologists. US readings from the surgical team and the radiologists were correlated with outcome. Results: One hundred-twelve patients were included in the study. Ninety-two patients had an US read as negative by the surgical and radiology services with no subsequent injuries identified. Eighteen patients had an US deemed positive by the surgical service and radiologists. Injuries were confirmed in this group by operation or computed tomography. One patient had an US deemed positive by the surgical team and subsequently negative by the radiologist. A diagnostic peritoneal lavage was performed which was negative. Another patient had an US interpreted as negative by the surgical evaluator and positive by the radiologist. Exploratory laparotomy was negative for intra-abdominal hemorrhage or organ injury. Overall results reveal an accuracy on US reading of 99% for the surgical team and 99% for the attending radiologists. Conclusion: Surgeons and surgical residents at different levels of training can accurately interpret emergency ultrasound examinations for blunt trauma from the real-time images, at a level comparable to attending radiologists.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)649-653
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care
Volume44
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 1998

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Emergencies
Wounds and Injuries
Reading
Peritoneal Lavage
Radiologists
Surgeons
Radiology
Laparotomy
Tomography
Prospective Studies
Hemorrhage

Keywords

  • Prospective
  • Radiologist
  • Surgeon
  • Trauma
  • Ultrasonography
  • Wounds and injuries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Can surgeons evaluate emergency ultrasound scans for blunt abdominal trauma? / McKenney, Mark G.; McKenney, K. L.; Compton, R. P.; Namias, Nicholas; Fernandez, L.; Levi, D.; Arrillaga, A.; Lynn, Mauricio; Martin, L.

In: Journal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care, Vol. 44, No. 4, 01.04.1998, p. 649-653.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McKenney, Mark G. ; McKenney, K. L. ; Compton, R. P. ; Namias, Nicholas ; Fernandez, L. ; Levi, D. ; Arrillaga, A. ; Lynn, Mauricio ; Martin, L. / Can surgeons evaluate emergency ultrasound scans for blunt abdominal trauma?. In: Journal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care. 1998 ; Vol. 44, No. 4. pp. 649-653.
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