Can Phone-Based Motivational Interviewing Improve Medication Adherence to Antiplatelet Medications After a Coronary Stent Among Racial Minorities? A Randomized Trial

Ana M Palacio, Claudia Uribe, Leslie Hazel-Fernandez, Hua Li, Leonardo Tamariz, Sylvia D. Garay, Olveen Carrasquillo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Minorities have lower adherence to cardiovascular medications and have worst cardiovascular outcomes post coronary stent placement

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to compare the efficacy of phone-delivered Motivational Interviewing (MINT) to an educational video at improving adherence to antiplatelet medications among insured minorities.

DESIGN: This was a randomized study.

PARTICIPANTS: We identified minorities with a recently placed coronary stent from an administrative data set by using a previously validated algorithm.

INTERVENTIONS: MINT subjects received quarterly phone calls and the DVD group received a one-time mailed video.

MAIN MEASURES: Outcome variables were collected at baseline and at 12-month post-stent, using surveys and administrative data. The primary outcome was antiplatelet (clopidogrel and prasugrel) adherence measured by Medication Possession Ratio (MPR) and self- reported adherence (Morisky score). We also measured appropriate adherence defined as an MPR ≥ 0.80.

KEY RESULTS: We recruited 452 minority subjects with a new coronary stent (44 % Hispanics and 56 % Black). The patients had a mean age of 69.5 ± 8.8, 58 % were males, 78 % had an income lower than $30,000 per year and only 22 % had achieved high school education or higher. The MPR for antiplatelet medications was 0.77 for the MINT group compared to 0.70 for the DVD group (p < 0.05). The percentage of subjects with adequate adherence to their antiplatelet medication was 64 % in the MINT group and 50 % in the DVD group (p < 0.01). Self-reported adherence at 12 months was higher in the MINT group compared to the DVD group (p < 0.01). Results were similar among drug-eluting stent (DES) recipients.

CONCLUSIONS: Among racial minorities, a phone-based motivational interview is effective at improving adherence to antiplatelet medications post coronary stent placement. Phone-based MINT seems to be a promising and cost-effective strategy to modify risk behaviors among minority populations at high cardiovascular risk.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)469-475
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of General Internal Medicine
Volume30
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2015

Fingerprint

Motivational Interviewing
Medication Adherence
Stents
clopidogrel
Drug-Eluting Stents
Risk-Taking
Hispanic Americans
Interviews
Education
Costs and Cost Analysis
Population

Keywords

  • antiplatelet medications
  • coronary stents
  • medication adherence
  • minorities
  • motivational interviewing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

@article{bc9fd9136aff4501b5976267b53728e0,
title = "Can Phone-Based Motivational Interviewing Improve Medication Adherence to Antiplatelet Medications After a Coronary Stent Among Racial Minorities? A Randomized Trial",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Minorities have lower adherence to cardiovascular medications and have worst cardiovascular outcomes post coronary stent placementOBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to compare the efficacy of phone-delivered Motivational Interviewing (MINT) to an educational video at improving adherence to antiplatelet medications among insured minorities.DESIGN: This was a randomized study.PARTICIPANTS: We identified minorities with a recently placed coronary stent from an administrative data set by using a previously validated algorithm.INTERVENTIONS: MINT subjects received quarterly phone calls and the DVD group received a one-time mailed video.MAIN MEASURES: Outcome variables were collected at baseline and at 12-month post-stent, using surveys and administrative data. The primary outcome was antiplatelet (clopidogrel and prasugrel) adherence measured by Medication Possession Ratio (MPR) and self- reported adherence (Morisky score). We also measured appropriate adherence defined as an MPR ≥ 0.80.KEY RESULTS: We recruited 452 minority subjects with a new coronary stent (44 {\%} Hispanics and 56 {\%} Black). The patients had a mean age of 69.5 ± 8.8, 58 {\%} were males, 78 {\%} had an income lower than $30,000 per year and only 22 {\%} had achieved high school education or higher. The MPR for antiplatelet medications was 0.77 for the MINT group compared to 0.70 for the DVD group (p < 0.05). The percentage of subjects with adequate adherence to their antiplatelet medication was 64 {\%} in the MINT group and 50 {\%} in the DVD group (p < 0.01). Self-reported adherence at 12 months was higher in the MINT group compared to the DVD group (p < 0.01). Results were similar among drug-eluting stent (DES) recipients.CONCLUSIONS: Among racial minorities, a phone-based motivational interview is effective at improving adherence to antiplatelet medications post coronary stent placement. Phone-based MINT seems to be a promising and cost-effective strategy to modify risk behaviors among minority populations at high cardiovascular risk.",
keywords = "antiplatelet medications, coronary stents, medication adherence, minorities, motivational interviewing",
author = "Palacio, {Ana M} and Claudia Uribe and Leslie Hazel-Fernandez and Hua Li and Leonardo Tamariz and Garay, {Sylvia D.} and Olveen Carrasquillo",
year = "2015",
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doi = "10.1007/s11606-014-3139-8",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "30",
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T1 - Can Phone-Based Motivational Interviewing Improve Medication Adherence to Antiplatelet Medications After a Coronary Stent Among Racial Minorities? A Randomized Trial

AU - Palacio, Ana M

AU - Uribe, Claudia

AU - Hazel-Fernandez, Leslie

AU - Li, Hua

AU - Tamariz, Leonardo

AU - Garay, Sylvia D.

AU - Carrasquillo, Olveen

PY - 2015/4/1

Y1 - 2015/4/1

N2 - BACKGROUND: Minorities have lower adherence to cardiovascular medications and have worst cardiovascular outcomes post coronary stent placementOBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to compare the efficacy of phone-delivered Motivational Interviewing (MINT) to an educational video at improving adherence to antiplatelet medications among insured minorities.DESIGN: This was a randomized study.PARTICIPANTS: We identified minorities with a recently placed coronary stent from an administrative data set by using a previously validated algorithm.INTERVENTIONS: MINT subjects received quarterly phone calls and the DVD group received a one-time mailed video.MAIN MEASURES: Outcome variables were collected at baseline and at 12-month post-stent, using surveys and administrative data. The primary outcome was antiplatelet (clopidogrel and prasugrel) adherence measured by Medication Possession Ratio (MPR) and self- reported adherence (Morisky score). We also measured appropriate adherence defined as an MPR ≥ 0.80.KEY RESULTS: We recruited 452 minority subjects with a new coronary stent (44 % Hispanics and 56 % Black). The patients had a mean age of 69.5 ± 8.8, 58 % were males, 78 % had an income lower than $30,000 per year and only 22 % had achieved high school education or higher. The MPR for antiplatelet medications was 0.77 for the MINT group compared to 0.70 for the DVD group (p < 0.05). The percentage of subjects with adequate adherence to their antiplatelet medication was 64 % in the MINT group and 50 % in the DVD group (p < 0.01). Self-reported adherence at 12 months was higher in the MINT group compared to the DVD group (p < 0.01). Results were similar among drug-eluting stent (DES) recipients.CONCLUSIONS: Among racial minorities, a phone-based motivational interview is effective at improving adherence to antiplatelet medications post coronary stent placement. Phone-based MINT seems to be a promising and cost-effective strategy to modify risk behaviors among minority populations at high cardiovascular risk.

AB - BACKGROUND: Minorities have lower adherence to cardiovascular medications and have worst cardiovascular outcomes post coronary stent placementOBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to compare the efficacy of phone-delivered Motivational Interviewing (MINT) to an educational video at improving adherence to antiplatelet medications among insured minorities.DESIGN: This was a randomized study.PARTICIPANTS: We identified minorities with a recently placed coronary stent from an administrative data set by using a previously validated algorithm.INTERVENTIONS: MINT subjects received quarterly phone calls and the DVD group received a one-time mailed video.MAIN MEASURES: Outcome variables were collected at baseline and at 12-month post-stent, using surveys and administrative data. The primary outcome was antiplatelet (clopidogrel and prasugrel) adherence measured by Medication Possession Ratio (MPR) and self- reported adherence (Morisky score). We also measured appropriate adherence defined as an MPR ≥ 0.80.KEY RESULTS: We recruited 452 minority subjects with a new coronary stent (44 % Hispanics and 56 % Black). The patients had a mean age of 69.5 ± 8.8, 58 % were males, 78 % had an income lower than $30,000 per year and only 22 % had achieved high school education or higher. The MPR for antiplatelet medications was 0.77 for the MINT group compared to 0.70 for the DVD group (p < 0.05). The percentage of subjects with adequate adherence to their antiplatelet medication was 64 % in the MINT group and 50 % in the DVD group (p < 0.01). Self-reported adherence at 12 months was higher in the MINT group compared to the DVD group (p < 0.01). Results were similar among drug-eluting stent (DES) recipients.CONCLUSIONS: Among racial minorities, a phone-based motivational interview is effective at improving adherence to antiplatelet medications post coronary stent placement. Phone-based MINT seems to be a promising and cost-effective strategy to modify risk behaviors among minority populations at high cardiovascular risk.

KW - antiplatelet medications

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