Can behavioral theory inform the understanding of depression and medication nonadherence among HIV-positive substance users?

Jessica F. Magidson, Alyson Listhaus, C. J. Seitz-Brown, Steven Safren, C. W. Lejuez, Stacey B. Daughters

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Medication adherence is highly predictive of health outcomes across chronic conditions, particularly HIV/AIDS. Depression is consistently associated with worse adherence, yet few studies have sought to understand how depression relates to adherence. This study tested three components of behavioral depression theory—goal-directed activation, positive reinforcement, and environmental punishment—as potential indirect effects in the relation between depressive symptoms and medication nonadherence among low-income, predominantly African American substance users (n = 83). Medication nonadherence was assessed as frequency of doses missed across common reasons for nonadherence. Non-parametric bootstrapping was used to evaluate the indirect effects. Of the three intermediary variables, there was only an indirect effect of environmental punishment; depressive symptoms were associated with greater nonadherence through greater environmental punishment. Goal-directed activation and positive reinforcement were unrelated to adherence. Findings suggest the importance of environmental punishment in the relation between depression and medication adherence and may inform future intervention efforts for this population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)337-347
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Behavioral Medicine
Volume38
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Medication Adherence
HIV
Depression
Punishment
African Americans
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Health
Population

Keywords

  • Behavioral theory
  • Depression
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Medication adherence
  • Substance use

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Can behavioral theory inform the understanding of depression and medication nonadherence among HIV-positive substance users? / Magidson, Jessica F.; Listhaus, Alyson; Seitz-Brown, C. J.; Safren, Steven; Lejuez, C. W.; Daughters, Stacey B.

In: Journal of Behavioral Medicine, Vol. 38, No. 2, 2015, p. 337-347.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Magidson, Jessica F. ; Listhaus, Alyson ; Seitz-Brown, C. J. ; Safren, Steven ; Lejuez, C. W. ; Daughters, Stacey B. / Can behavioral theory inform the understanding of depression and medication nonadherence among HIV-positive substance users?. In: Journal of Behavioral Medicine. 2015 ; Vol. 38, No. 2. pp. 337-347.
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