Burn injuries benefit from massage therapy

Tiffany Field, Michael Peck, Scott Krugman, Tammy Tuchel, Saul Schanberg, Cynthia Kuhn, Iris Burman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

83 Scopus citations

Abstract

Twenty-eight adult patients with burns were randomly assigned before debridement to either a massage therapy group or a standard treatment control group. State anxiety and cortisul levels decreased, and behavior ratings of state, activity, vocalizations, and anxiety improved after the massage therapy sessions on the first and last days of treatment. Longer-term effects were also significantly better for the massage therapy group including decreases in depression and anger, and decreased pain on the McGill Pain Questionnaire, Present Pain Intensity scale, and Visual Analogue Scale. Although the underlying mechanisms are not known, these data suggest that debridement sessions were less painful after the massage therapy sessions due to a reduction in anxiety, and that the clinical course was probably enhanced as the result of a reduction in pain, anger, and depression.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)241-244
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Burn Care and Rehabilitation
Volume19
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1998

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Nursing(all)
  • Emergency Medicine
  • Rehabilitation
  • Health Professions(all)

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    Field, T., Peck, M., Krugman, S., Tuchel, T., Schanberg, S., Kuhn, C., & Burman, I. (1998). Burn injuries benefit from massage therapy. Journal of Burn Care and Rehabilitation, 19(3), 241-244. https://doi.org/10.1097/00004630-199805000-00010