Bulimic adolescents benefit from massage therapy

Tiffany Field, Saul Schanberg, Cynthia Kuhn, Tory Field, Karen Fierro, Tanja Henteleff, Cynthia Mueller, Regina Yando, Seana Shaw, Iris Burman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

55 Scopus citations

Abstract

Twenty-four female adolescent bulimic inpatients were randomly assigned to a massage therapy or a standard treatment (control) group. Results indicated that the massaged patients showed immediate reductions (both self-report and behavior observation) in anxiety and depression. In addition, by the last day of the therapy, they had lower depression scores, lower cortisol (stress) levels, higher dopamine levels, and showed improvement on several other psychological and behavioral measures. These findings suggest that massage therapy is effective as an adjunct treatment for bulimia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)555-563
Number of pages9
JournalAdolescence
Volume33
Issue number131
StatePublished - Sep 1 1998

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

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    Field, T., Schanberg, S., Kuhn, C., Field, T., Fierro, K., Henteleff, T., Mueller, C., Yando, R., Shaw, S., & Burman, I. (1998). Bulimic adolescents benefit from massage therapy. Adolescence, 33(131), 555-563.