Building reflective practices in a pre-service math and science teacher education course that focuses on qualitative video analysis

Lauren Barth-Cohen, Angela J. Little, Dor Abrahamson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The use of video for in-service and pre-service teacher development has been gaining acceptance, and yet video remains a challenging and understudied tool. Many projects have used video to help pre-service and in-service teachers reflect on their own teaching processes, examine teacher–student interactions, and develop their professional vision. But rarely has video been used in ways more akin to qualitative education research that is focused on student learning. Even more rarely has this focus occurred at the earliest stages of pre-service teaching when students have not yet decided to pursue teaching careers. Yet here we argue that there are benefits to our approach. We examine a course for prospective pre-service math and science teachers at the University of California, Berkeley, that engages participants in qualitative video analysis to foster their reflective practice. This course is unique in that the prospective pre-service teachers engage in qualitative video analysis at a level characteristic of professional educational research, in that their analysis focuses on student learning of math and science content. We describe classroom activities that provide opportunities for the preservice teacher participants to better observe, notice, and interpret their students’ sociocognitive activity. The course culmination project involves participants developing and teaching lessons in a high school classroom. The participants then videotape the lessons and conduct qualitative video analysis. Results include detailed examples of two selected prospective pre-service teachers demonstrating coherent and effective approaches to conceptualizing the learning and teaching of mathematical and science content along with some potential design principles for building reflective practices through qualitative video projects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)83-101
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Science Teacher Education
Volume29
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018
Externally publishedYes

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Keywords

  • Pre-service teachers
  • Qualitative analysis
  • Reflective practices
  • Video

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

Cite this

Building reflective practices in a pre-service math and science teacher education course that focuses on qualitative video analysis. / Barth-Cohen, Lauren; Little, Angela J.; Abrahamson, Dor.

In: Journal of Science Teacher Education, Vol. 29, No. 2, 01.01.2018, p. 83-101.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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