Breast IMRT

Douglas W. Arthur, Monica M. Morris, Frank A. Vicini, Nesrin Dogan

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The radiation oncologist is involved in the management of breast cancer patients throughout the spectrum of the disease: fromadjuvant treatment of early and locally advanced stage to palliative treatment of metastasis. In the adjuvant setting there are two distinct clinical situations; (1) treatment of the breast only following breast conserving surgery for early stage disease and (2) treatment to the breast|chest wall and regional nodes for locally advanced disease. The use of radiotherapy in these clinical settings has been shown to improve local, local-regional control and overall survival [1-4]. When radiotherapy was first introduced into these clinical settings, broad field designs were used. These original broad fields were simplistic in design, and limited by the planning and treatment delivery systems available. However, because of their simplicity, success in reducing disease recurrence, and ease of implementation, these treatment techniquesquicklybecamewidely adopted. In fact, themajorityof treatment centers today continue the same general disease management principles and treatment approaches originally designed and practiced in the 1970s and 1980s. Although upgraded field matching techniques and CT based treatment planning have been incorporated in many centers, minimal modifications have been made until recentlywith the emergence of image based treatment planning and advanced, intensity modulated radiotherapy delivery techniques. Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) in the treatment of breast cancer offers improved dose conformality and homogeneity. Only through appropriate investigation will we be able to determine whether this improvement in dose delivery actually translates into a clinical benefit and, therefore, justify widespread adoption of this treatment technology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationImage-Guided IMRT
PublisherSpringer Berlin Heidelberg
Pages371-381
Number of pages11
ISBN (Print)354020511X, 9783540205111
DOIs
StatePublished - 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy
Breast
Therapeutics
Radiotherapy
Breast Neoplasms
Segmental Mastectomy
Thoracic Wall
Disease Management
Palliative Care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Arthur, D. W., Morris, M. M., Vicini, F. A., & Dogan, N. (2006). Breast IMRT. In Image-Guided IMRT (pp. 371-381). Springer Berlin Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/3-540-30356-1_29

Breast IMRT. / Arthur, Douglas W.; Morris, Monica M.; Vicini, Frank A.; Dogan, Nesrin.

Image-Guided IMRT. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2006. p. 371-381.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Arthur, DW, Morris, MM, Vicini, FA & Dogan, N 2006, Breast IMRT. in Image-Guided IMRT. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, pp. 371-381. https://doi.org/10.1007/3-540-30356-1_29
Arthur DW, Morris MM, Vicini FA, Dogan N. Breast IMRT. In Image-Guided IMRT. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. 2006. p. 371-381 https://doi.org/10.1007/3-540-30356-1_29
Arthur, Douglas W. ; Morris, Monica M. ; Vicini, Frank A. ; Dogan, Nesrin. / Breast IMRT. Image-Guided IMRT. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2006. pp. 371-381
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