Breast cancer care quality in South Africa’s public health system: An evaluation using American society of clinical oncology/national quality forum measures

Daniel S. O’Neil, Wenlong Carl Chen, Oluwatosin Ayeni, Sarah Nietz, Ines Buccimazza, Urishka Singh, Sharon Čačala, Laura Stopforth, Maureen Joffe, Katherine D. Crew, Judith S. Jacobson, Alfred I. Neugut, Paul Ruff, Herbert Cubasch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

PURPOSE The quality of breast cancer care in sub-Saharan Africa contributes to the region’s dismal breast cancer mortality. ASCO has issued quality measures focusing on delivery of adjuvant chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and endocrine therapy. We applied these measures in five South African public hospitals and analyzed factors associated with care concordance. MATERIALS AND METHODS Among 1,736 women with breast cancer who were enrolled in the South African Breast Cancer and HIV Outcomes study over 24 months, we evaluated care using ASCO’s three measures. We also evaluated adjuvant chemotherapy receipt in 957 women with an indication. We used logistic regression to estimate associations between measure-concordant care and patient factors. RESULTS Of 235 women with hormone receptor–negative cancer, 173 (74%) began adjuvant chemotherapy within 120 days from diagnosis. Of 194 patients who received breast-conserving surgery, 73 (37%) began radiotherapy within 365 days from diagnosis. Of 999 women with hormone receptor–positive cancer, 719 (72%) initiated endocrine therapy within 365 days from diagnosis. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy measure-concordant care were more common among women residing, 20 km from the hospital (odds ratio [OR], 1.79; 95% CI, 1.32 to 2.44 and OR, 3.17; 95% CI, 1.57 to 6.42). Endocrine therapy measure-concordant care was more common among English-speaking women (OR, 2.12; 95% CI, 1.12 to 4.02). Participating hospitals varied in care concordance. HIV infection did not affect care quality. CONCLUSION More timely delivery of chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and endocrine therapy is needed in South Africa, particularly for women living . 20 km from the hospital or not speaking English. Focused quality improvement efforts could support that goal.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-16
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Global Oncology
Volume2019
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2019
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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