Bone transplantation and human immunodeficiency virus: An estimate of risk of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)

Billy E. Buck, T. I. Malinin, M. D. Brown

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

501 Scopus citations

Abstract

The possibility of transplanting a bone allograft from a donor infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is remote, provided there is a combination of rigorous donor selection and exclusion, screening for the HIV antigen and antibody, and histopathologic studies of donor tissues. The chance of obtaining a bone allograft from an HIV-infected donor who failed to be excluded by the above techniques is calculated to be one in well over a million, using average estimates. On the other hand, if adequate precautions are not taken (for example, by testing only for antibodies to HIV), the risk might be as high as one in 161.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)129-136
Number of pages8
JournalClinical orthopaedics and related research
Issue number240
StatePublished - Jan 1 1989

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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