Body mass index and quality of life in community-dwelling patients with schizophrenia

Martin T Strassnig, Jaspreet Singh Brar, Rohan Ganguli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

101 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To examine the associations between sociodemographic variables, body weight and quality of life in schizophrenic outpatients. Methods: Assessments included an interview to obtain sociodemographic data, administration of a Quality of Life questionnaire (the MOS SF-36) and measurement of height and weight. Body mass index was calculated (kg/m2). SF-36 subscores were examined for statistical differences based on BMI categories: healthy weight (BMI≤24.9), overweight (BMI 25-29.9) and obese (BMI≥30). Correlations with sociodemographic variables were also examined. Results: Body weight was inversely correlated (level p≤0.005) to the SF-36 items: physical functioning (PF, -0.452), role limitations due to physical functioning (-0.279), role limitations due to emotional functioning (-0.256), vitality (-0.200), general health (GH, -0.367) and physical component score (PCS, -0.400). Mental component score (MCS) was not significantly correlated to body weight. When comparing quality of life across BMI categories, obese subjects had worse physical functioning (p≤0.0005) and general health (p≤0.005), reported more role limitations due to emotional functioning (p≤0.05) and a lower physical component score (p≤0.005). Mental component score was not significantly influenced by BMI. Conclusions: Quality of life in schizophrenic patients is related to body weight. The burden of obesity is primarily experienced as a physical problem.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)73-76
Number of pages4
JournalSchizophrenia Research
Volume62
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

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Independent Living
Schizophrenia
Body Mass Index
Body Weight
Quality of Life
Weights and Measures
Health
Outpatients
Obesity
Interviews

Keywords

  • Body mass index
  • Community-dwelling patient
  • Quality of life

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Biological Psychiatry
  • Neurology
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Body mass index and quality of life in community-dwelling patients with schizophrenia. / Strassnig, Martin T; Brar, Jaspreet Singh; Ganguli, Rohan.

In: Schizophrenia Research, Vol. 62, No. 1-2, 01.07.2003, p. 73-76.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Strassnig, Martin T ; Brar, Jaspreet Singh ; Ganguli, Rohan. / Body mass index and quality of life in community-dwelling patients with schizophrenia. In: Schizophrenia Research. 2003 ; Vol. 62, No. 1-2. pp. 73-76.
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