Black–white latino racial disparities in HIV survival, Florida, 2000–2011

Diana M. Sheehan, Mary Jo Trepka, Kristopher P. Fennie, Guillermo J Prado, Miguel Ángel Cano, Lorene M. Maddox

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This research aimed to estimate Black/White racial disparities in all-cause mortality risk among HIV-positive Latinos. Florida surveillance data for Latinos diagnosed with HIV (2000–2008) were merged with 2007–2011 American Community Survey data. Crude and adjusted hazard ratios (aHR) were calculated using multi-level Cox regression. Of 10,903 HIV-positive Latinos, 8.2% were Black and 91.9% White. Black Latinos were at increased mortality risk compared with White Latinos after controlling for individual and neighborhood factors (aHR 1.40, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.21–1.62). In stratified analyses, risk factors for Black Latinos included: age ≥60 years compared with ages 13–19 (aHR 4.63, 95% CI 1.32–16.13); US birth compared with foreign birth (aHR 1.56, 95% CI 1.16–2.11); diagnosis of AIDS within three months of HIV diagnosis (aHR 3.53, 95% CI 2.64–4.74); residence in the 3rd (aHR 1.82, 95% CI 1.13–2.94) and 4th highest quartiles (aHR 1.79, 95% CI 1.12–2.86) of neighborhood poverty compared with the lowest quartile; and residence in neighborhood with 25%–49% (aHR 1.59, 95% CI 1.07–2.42) and ≥50% Latinos compared with <25% Latinos (aHR 1.58, 95% CI 1.03–2.42). Significant racial disparities in HIV survival exist among Latinos. Differential access to—and quality of—care and perceived/experienced racial discrimination may be possible explanations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number9
JournalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

Fingerprint

Hispanic Americans
HIV
Confidence Intervals
Parturition
Racism
Mortality
Poverty
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Research

Keywords

  • Human immunodeficiency virus
  • Latinos
  • Mortality
  • Neighborhood
  • Racial disparities

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

Black–white latino racial disparities in HIV survival, Florida, 2000–2011. / Sheehan, Diana M.; Trepka, Mary Jo; Fennie, Kristopher P.; Prado, Guillermo J; Cano, Miguel Ángel; Maddox, Lorene M.

In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, Vol. 13, No. 1, 9, 01.01.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sheehan, Diana M. ; Trepka, Mary Jo ; Fennie, Kristopher P. ; Prado, Guillermo J ; Cano, Miguel Ángel ; Maddox, Lorene M. / Black–white latino racial disparities in HIV survival, Florida, 2000–2011. In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2016 ; Vol. 13, No. 1.
@article{27071b0667034046bd5bc22f406380dc,
title = "Black–white latino racial disparities in HIV survival, Florida, 2000–2011",
abstract = "This research aimed to estimate Black/White racial disparities in all-cause mortality risk among HIV-positive Latinos. Florida surveillance data for Latinos diagnosed with HIV (2000–2008) were merged with 2007–2011 American Community Survey data. Crude and adjusted hazard ratios (aHR) were calculated using multi-level Cox regression. Of 10,903 HIV-positive Latinos, 8.2{\%} were Black and 91.9{\%} White. Black Latinos were at increased mortality risk compared with White Latinos after controlling for individual and neighborhood factors (aHR 1.40, 95{\%} confidence interval (CI) 1.21–1.62). In stratified analyses, risk factors for Black Latinos included: age ≥60 years compared with ages 13–19 (aHR 4.63, 95{\%} CI 1.32–16.13); US birth compared with foreign birth (aHR 1.56, 95{\%} CI 1.16–2.11); diagnosis of AIDS within three months of HIV diagnosis (aHR 3.53, 95{\%} CI 2.64–4.74); residence in the 3rd (aHR 1.82, 95{\%} CI 1.13–2.94) and 4th highest quartiles (aHR 1.79, 95{\%} CI 1.12–2.86) of neighborhood poverty compared with the lowest quartile; and residence in neighborhood with 25{\%}–49{\%} (aHR 1.59, 95{\%} CI 1.07–2.42) and ≥50{\%} Latinos compared with <25{\%} Latinos (aHR 1.58, 95{\%} CI 1.03–2.42). Significant racial disparities in HIV survival exist among Latinos. Differential access to—and quality of—care and perceived/experienced racial discrimination may be possible explanations.",
keywords = "Human immunodeficiency virus, Latinos, Mortality, Neighborhood, Racial disparities",
author = "Sheehan, {Diana M.} and Trepka, {Mary Jo} and Fennie, {Kristopher P.} and Prado, {Guillermo J} and Cano, {Miguel {\'A}ngel} and Maddox, {Lorene M.}",
year = "2016",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.3390/ijerph13010009",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "13",
journal = "International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health",
issn = "1661-7827",
publisher = "Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI)",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Black–white latino racial disparities in HIV survival, Florida, 2000–2011

AU - Sheehan, Diana M.

AU - Trepka, Mary Jo

AU - Fennie, Kristopher P.

AU - Prado, Guillermo J

AU - Cano, Miguel Ángel

AU - Maddox, Lorene M.

PY - 2016/1/1

Y1 - 2016/1/1

N2 - This research aimed to estimate Black/White racial disparities in all-cause mortality risk among HIV-positive Latinos. Florida surveillance data for Latinos diagnosed with HIV (2000–2008) were merged with 2007–2011 American Community Survey data. Crude and adjusted hazard ratios (aHR) were calculated using multi-level Cox regression. Of 10,903 HIV-positive Latinos, 8.2% were Black and 91.9% White. Black Latinos were at increased mortality risk compared with White Latinos after controlling for individual and neighborhood factors (aHR 1.40, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.21–1.62). In stratified analyses, risk factors for Black Latinos included: age ≥60 years compared with ages 13–19 (aHR 4.63, 95% CI 1.32–16.13); US birth compared with foreign birth (aHR 1.56, 95% CI 1.16–2.11); diagnosis of AIDS within three months of HIV diagnosis (aHR 3.53, 95% CI 2.64–4.74); residence in the 3rd (aHR 1.82, 95% CI 1.13–2.94) and 4th highest quartiles (aHR 1.79, 95% CI 1.12–2.86) of neighborhood poverty compared with the lowest quartile; and residence in neighborhood with 25%–49% (aHR 1.59, 95% CI 1.07–2.42) and ≥50% Latinos compared with <25% Latinos (aHR 1.58, 95% CI 1.03–2.42). Significant racial disparities in HIV survival exist among Latinos. Differential access to—and quality of—care and perceived/experienced racial discrimination may be possible explanations.

AB - This research aimed to estimate Black/White racial disparities in all-cause mortality risk among HIV-positive Latinos. Florida surveillance data for Latinos diagnosed with HIV (2000–2008) were merged with 2007–2011 American Community Survey data. Crude and adjusted hazard ratios (aHR) were calculated using multi-level Cox regression. Of 10,903 HIV-positive Latinos, 8.2% were Black and 91.9% White. Black Latinos were at increased mortality risk compared with White Latinos after controlling for individual and neighborhood factors (aHR 1.40, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.21–1.62). In stratified analyses, risk factors for Black Latinos included: age ≥60 years compared with ages 13–19 (aHR 4.63, 95% CI 1.32–16.13); US birth compared with foreign birth (aHR 1.56, 95% CI 1.16–2.11); diagnosis of AIDS within three months of HIV diagnosis (aHR 3.53, 95% CI 2.64–4.74); residence in the 3rd (aHR 1.82, 95% CI 1.13–2.94) and 4th highest quartiles (aHR 1.79, 95% CI 1.12–2.86) of neighborhood poverty compared with the lowest quartile; and residence in neighborhood with 25%–49% (aHR 1.59, 95% CI 1.07–2.42) and ≥50% Latinos compared with <25% Latinos (aHR 1.58, 95% CI 1.03–2.42). Significant racial disparities in HIV survival exist among Latinos. Differential access to—and quality of—care and perceived/experienced racial discrimination may be possible explanations.

KW - Human immunodeficiency virus

KW - Latinos

KW - Mortality

KW - Neighborhood

KW - Racial disparities

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84981734347&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84981734347&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3390/ijerph13010009

DO - 10.3390/ijerph13010009

M3 - Article

C2 - 26703656

AN - SCOPUS:84981734347

VL - 13

JO - International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health

JF - International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health

SN - 1661-7827

IS - 1

M1 - 9

ER -