Biomarker profiling for breast cancer detection: translational research to determine acceptance of a novel breast cancer screening technique

Nick Carcioppolo, Katheryn R. Christy, Jakob D. Jensen, Andy J. King, Julie Goonewardene, Daniel Raftery

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The current study seeks to determine how the psychosocial predictors of the health belief model are related to willingness to adopt biomarker screening practices among women above and below current screening age recommendations, as biomarker profiling can potentially detect cancer much earlier than current breast cancer detection methods. Patients (N = 205) at an Obstetrician/Gynaecology office in a mid-sized Midwest city. Participants completed a survey in the waiting room before their doctor appointment. Results revealed that benefits (p < .001), barriers (p = .02), cancer worry severity (p = .01), and self-efficacy (p = .002) were significant predictors of willingness to adopt biomarker profiling, and susceptibility was marginally related (p = .09). The direct effects are qualified by two interactions between psychosocial predictors of the health belief model and participants’ age. The model predicted willingness to adopt biomarker screening well (R2 = 28%), and may be used successfully as a framework to assess the diffusion of biomarker screening acceptability.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)44-51
Number of pages8
JournalHealth Systems
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2 2019

Keywords

  • Biomarker
  • breast cancer prevention
  • health belief model
  • translational research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Health Informatics

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