Bidirectional regulation of cytoplasmic polyadenylation element-binding protein phosphorylation by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and protein phosphatase 1 during hippocampal long-term potentiation

Coleen M Atkins, Monika A. Davare, Michael C. Oh, Victor Derkach, Thomas R. Soderling

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Induction of hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) requires activation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), whereas maintenance of LTP additionally requires protein synthesis. We recently reported that CaMKII stimulates protein synthesis in depolarized hippocampal neurons through phosphorylation of the mRNA translation factor cytoplasmic polyadenylation element-binding protein (CPEB), and this phosphorylation is rapidly reversed by protein phosphatase 1 (PP1). Protein synthesis-dependent late-phase LTP (L-LTP) in the hippocampus requires calcium influx through the NMDA-type glutamate receptor (NMDA-R) to activate CaMKII as well as concomitant inhibition of PP1 mediated by protein kinase A. Therefore, we investigated the regulation of CPEB phosphorylation during L-LTP. Pharmacological stimulation of the NMDA-R in hippocampal slices to produce chemical long-term depression induced a brief dephosphorylation of CPEB. Modest LTP induction (once at 100 Hz), which induces a protein synthesis-independent early-phase LTP (E-LTP), resulted in a transient phosphorylation of CPEB. However, stronger stimulation (four times at 100 Hz), known to induce protein synthesis-dependent L-LTP, elicited a prolonged phosphorylation of CPEB. Furthermore, CPEB phosphorylation correlated with phosphorylation of PP1 inhibitor dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein, a known substrate for protein kinase A. These results evoke the hypothesis that bidirectional regulation of CPEB phosphorylation by CaMKII and protein phosphatases may serve as a mechanism to convert E-LTP into protein synthesis-dependent L-LTP by stimulating protein synthesis and thereby stabilizing synaptic enhancement.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5604-5610
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Neuroscience
Volume25
Issue number23
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 8 2005

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Protein Phosphatase 1
Polyadenylation
Long-Term Potentiation
Carrier Proteins
Phosphorylation
Calcium-Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Type 2
Proteins
Glutamate Receptors
Cyclic AMP-Dependent Protein Kinases
N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptors
mRNA Cleavage and Polyadenylation Factors
Dopamine and cAMP-Regulated Phosphoprotein 32
calmodulin dependent protein kinase II phosphatase
Phosphoprotein Phosphatases
Protein Biosynthesis
Hippocampus
Maintenance
Pharmacology
Calcium
Neurons

Keywords

  • CaMKII
  • CPEB
  • DARPP-32
  • Long-term potentiation
  • Protein phosphatase
  • Protein synthesis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Bidirectional regulation of cytoplasmic polyadenylation element-binding protein phosphorylation by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and protein phosphatase 1 during hippocampal long-term potentiation. / Atkins, Coleen M; Davare, Monika A.; Oh, Michael C.; Derkach, Victor; Soderling, Thomas R.

In: Journal of Neuroscience, Vol. 25, No. 23, 08.06.2005, p. 5604-5610.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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