Biculturalism, differentness, loneliness, and alienation in Hispanic college students

Shirley A. Suarez, Blaine Fowers, Carolyn S. Garwood, Jose Szapocznik

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Abstract

A multivariate framework was used to explore relationships among biculturalism, differentness, loneliness, and alienation in Hispanic college students. A diathesis-stress hypothesis predicted biculturalism would buffer feelings of loneliness and alienation resulting from feelings of differentness in Hispanic college students in a bicultural context. In a sample of 138 undergraduate Hispanic students, there was an inverse relationship between biculturalism and the degree of loneliness and alienation reported. Furthermore, a direct relationship was apparent between perceived differences in value orientations from those of family members and the degree of loneliness and alienation reported. The diathesis-stress model was not supported because the hypothesized stress-buffering interactions of difference from family with biculturalism and of difference from peers with biculturalism did not significantly affect loneliness or alienation. Biculturalism was the best predictor of loneliness, whereas perceived differences in value orientations between students and their family was the most important predictor of alienation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)489-505
Number of pages17
JournalHispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences
Volume19
Issue number4
StatePublished - Nov 1 1997
Externally publishedYes

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

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