Beneficial role of pancreatic microenvironment for angiogenesis in transplanted pancreatic islets

Joey Lau, Caroline Kampf, Göran Mattsson, Daniel Nyqvist, Martin Köhler, Per Olof Berggren, Per Ola Carlsson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Pancreatic islets implanted heterotopically (i.e., into the kidney, spleen, or liver) become poorly revascularized following transplantation. We hypothesized that islets implanted into the pancreas would become better revascularized. Islets isolated from transgenic mice expressing enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP) in all somatic cells were cultured before they were implanted into the pancreas or beneath the renal capsule of athymic mice. Vascular density was evaluated in histological sections 1 month posttransplantation. EYFP was used as reporter for the transgene to identify the transplanted islets. Islet endothelial cells were visualized by staining with the lectin Bandeiraea simplicifolia (BS-1). Capillary numbers in intrapancreatically implanted islets were only slightly lower than those counted in endogenous islets, whereas islets implanted beneath the renal capsule had a markedly lower vascular density. In order to determine if this high graft vascular density at the intrapancreatic site reflected expansion of remnant donor endothelial cells or increased ingrowth of blood vessels from the host, also islets from Tie2-green fluorescent protein (GFP) mice (i.e., islets with fluorescent endothelial cells) were transplanted into the pancreas or beneath the renal capsule of athymic mice. These islet grafts revealed that the new vascular structures formed in the islet grafts contained very few GFP-positive cells, and thus mainly were of recipient origin. The reason(s) for the much better ingrowth of blood vessels at the intrapancreatic site merits further studies, because this may help us form strategies to overcome the barrier for ingrowth of host vessels also into islets in heterotopic implantation sites.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)23-30
Number of pages8
JournalCell Transplantation
Volume18
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 16 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Islets of Langerhans
Blood Vessels
Endothelial cells
Grafts
Proteins
Blood vessels
Capsules
Kidney
Pancreas
Endothelial Cells
Green Fluorescent Proteins
Transplants
Nude Mice
Liver
Cells
Transgenes
Transgenic Mice
Cultured Cells
Spleen
Transplantation

Keywords

  • Angiogenesis
  • Bandeiraea simplicifolia
  • Engraftment
  • Islet graft
  • Pancreas

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology
  • Transplantation
  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

Lau, J., Kampf, C., Mattsson, G., Nyqvist, D., Köhler, M., Berggren, P. O., & Carlsson, P. O. (2009). Beneficial role of pancreatic microenvironment for angiogenesis in transplanted pancreatic islets. Cell Transplantation, 18(1), 23-30. https://doi.org/10.3727/096368909788237131

Beneficial role of pancreatic microenvironment for angiogenesis in transplanted pancreatic islets. / Lau, Joey; Kampf, Caroline; Mattsson, Göran; Nyqvist, Daniel; Köhler, Martin; Berggren, Per Olof; Carlsson, Per Ola.

In: Cell Transplantation, Vol. 18, No. 1, 16.06.2009, p. 23-30.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lau, J, Kampf, C, Mattsson, G, Nyqvist, D, Köhler, M, Berggren, PO & Carlsson, PO 2009, 'Beneficial role of pancreatic microenvironment for angiogenesis in transplanted pancreatic islets', Cell Transplantation, vol. 18, no. 1, pp. 23-30. https://doi.org/10.3727/096368909788237131
Lau, Joey ; Kampf, Caroline ; Mattsson, Göran ; Nyqvist, Daniel ; Köhler, Martin ; Berggren, Per Olof ; Carlsson, Per Ola. / Beneficial role of pancreatic microenvironment for angiogenesis in transplanted pancreatic islets. In: Cell Transplantation. 2009 ; Vol. 18, No. 1. pp. 23-30.
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