Beliefs about condoms and accessibility of condom intentions in Hispanic and African American youth.

Anne E Norris, K. Ford

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The construct accessibility model (CAM) holds that constructs are most likely to influence behavior when they are accessible in memory. While the theory of reasoned action sees intention as an important determinant of behavior, the CAM predicts that the intention to act upon a given health behavior is not likely to be acted upon unless the intention is in an accessible state. Therefore, people who frequently talk about or think about using condoms are likely to have condom related constructs available and use them when needed. This paper reports findings from the pilot phase of a project to identify beliefs which influence condom use in Hispanic and African-American youth living in Detroit. 15 male and 15 female Hispanics and 17 male and 17 female African-Americans aged 15-21 years of mean and median age 18.5, were interviewed face-to-face in 1989 with the goal of identifying condom beliefs which may influence their condom use. 80-82% of male participants, 53% of Hispanic females, and 100% of Black females had experienced sexual intercourse, with age at first intercourse ranging between 13.1 and 16.5 years. 88% of Black women and 7% of Hispanic women were pregnant at the interview. Regarding participants' level of preventive knowledge, all but 1 recently immigrated Hispanic female knew HIV was transmitted by needles and sexual intercourse. 87% of Hispanics and 94% of African-Americans responded that condoms protect against AIDS, but only 13% of Hispanics and 47% of African-Americans knew that nonlatex condoms do not. Some participants expressed concern that condoms reduce sensitivity and/or break during intercourse. Controlling for sexual activity, 25% of Hispanic females, 83% of Hispanic males, 71% of African-American females, and 80% of African-American males had ever used a condom; no Hispanic and 14% of Blacks reported using them consistently in the 12 month period preceding the interview. With 100% of African-American males and 97% of Black females reporting thinking about using condoms compared to 80% of Hispanics, the study findings suggest that condom intentions are more accessible in African-Americans than among Hispanics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)373-382
Number of pages10
JournalHispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences
Volume14
Issue number3
StatePublished - Aug 1992
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Condoms
Hispanic Americans
African Americans
Coitus
American
interview
health behavior
Interviews
AIDS
Health Behavior
determinants
Sexual Behavior
Needles
Pregnant Women
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
HIV

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Beliefs about condoms and accessibility of condom intentions in Hispanic and African American youth. / Norris, Anne E; Ford, K.

In: Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences, Vol. 14, No. 3, 08.1992, p. 373-382.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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