Basic science research in urology training

D. Eberli, A. Atala

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The role of basic science exposure during urology training is a timely topic that is relevant to urologic health and to the training of new physician scientists. Today, researchers are needed for the advancement of this specialty, and involvement in basic research will foster understanding of basic scientific concepts and the development of critical thinking skills, which will, in turn, improve clinical performance. If research education is not included in urology training, future urologists may not be as likely to contribute to scientific discoveries. Currently, only a minority of urologists in training are currently exposed to significant research experience. In addition, the number of physician-scientists in urology has been decreasing over the last two decades, as fewer physicians are willing to undertake a career in academics and perform basic research. However, to ensure that the field of urology is driving forward and bringing novel techniques to patients, it is clear that more research-trained urologists are needed. In this article we will analyse the current status of basic research in urology training and discuss the importance of and obstacles to successful addition of research into the medical training curricula. Further, we will highlight different opportunities for trainees to obtain significant research exposure in urology.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)217-220
Number of pages4
JournalIndian Journal of Urology
Volume25
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Urology
Research
Physicians
Curriculum
Biomedical Research
Research Personnel
Education
Health
Urologists

Keywords

  • Clinician-scientist
  • Discovery
  • Funding
  • Translation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

Basic science research in urology training. / Eberli, D.; Atala, A.

In: Indian Journal of Urology, Vol. 25, No. 2, 01.07.2009, p. 217-220.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Eberli, D. ; Atala, A. / Basic science research in urology training. In: Indian Journal of Urology. 2009 ; Vol. 25, No. 2. pp. 217-220.
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