Barriers to effective teaching

Debra A. DaRosa, Kelley Skeff, Joan A. Friedland, Michael Coburn, Susan Cox, Susan Pollart, Mark O'connell, Sandy Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Medical school faculty members are charged with the critical responsibility of preparing the future physician and medical scientist workforce. Recent reports suggest that medical school curricula have not kept pace with societal needs and that medical schools are graduating students who lack the knowledge and skills needed to practice effectively in the 21st century. The majority of faculty members want to be effective teachers and graduate well-prepared medical students, but multiple and complex factors-curricular, cultural, environmental, and financial-impede their efforts. Curricular impediments to effective teaching include unclear definitions of and disagreement on learning needs, misunderstood or unstated goals and objectives, and curriculum sequencing challenges. Student and faculty attitudes, too few faculty development opportunities, and the lack of an award system for teaching all are major culture-based barriers. Environmental barriers, such as time limitations, the setting, and the physical space in which medical education takes place, and financial barriers, such as limited education budgets, also pose serious challenges to even the most committed teachers. This article delineates the barriers to effective teaching as noted in the literature and recommends action items, some of which are incremental whereas others represent major change. Physicians-in-training, medical faculty, and society are depending on medical education leaders to address these barriers to effect the changes needed to enhance teaching and learning.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)453-459
Number of pages7
JournalAcademic Medicine
Volume86
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Teaching
Medical Schools
Medical Faculties
Medical Education
Curriculum
Learning
Students
Physicians
physician
Medical Societies
school
Budgets
curriculum
education
Medical Students
lack
teacher
learning
medical student
Education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Education

Cite this

DaRosa, D. A., Skeff, K., Friedland, J. A., Coburn, M., Cox, S., Pollart, S., ... Smith, S. (2011). Barriers to effective teaching. Academic Medicine, 86(4), 453-459. https://doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0b013e31820defbe

Barriers to effective teaching. / DaRosa, Debra A.; Skeff, Kelley; Friedland, Joan A.; Coburn, Michael; Cox, Susan; Pollart, Susan; O'connell, Mark; Smith, Sandy.

In: Academic Medicine, Vol. 86, No. 4, 01.04.2011, p. 453-459.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

DaRosa, DA, Skeff, K, Friedland, JA, Coburn, M, Cox, S, Pollart, S, O'connell, M & Smith, S 2011, 'Barriers to effective teaching', Academic Medicine, vol. 86, no. 4, pp. 453-459. https://doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0b013e31820defbe
DaRosa DA, Skeff K, Friedland JA, Coburn M, Cox S, Pollart S et al. Barriers to effective teaching. Academic Medicine. 2011 Apr 1;86(4):453-459. https://doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0b013e31820defbe
DaRosa, Debra A. ; Skeff, Kelley ; Friedland, Joan A. ; Coburn, Michael ; Cox, Susan ; Pollart, Susan ; O'connell, Mark ; Smith, Sandy. / Barriers to effective teaching. In: Academic Medicine. 2011 ; Vol. 86, No. 4. pp. 453-459.
@article{de38a22e140a4cbaa64570dc67f3c04a,
title = "Barriers to effective teaching",
abstract = "Medical school faculty members are charged with the critical responsibility of preparing the future physician and medical scientist workforce. Recent reports suggest that medical school curricula have not kept pace with societal needs and that medical schools are graduating students who lack the knowledge and skills needed to practice effectively in the 21st century. The majority of faculty members want to be effective teachers and graduate well-prepared medical students, but multiple and complex factors-curricular, cultural, environmental, and financial-impede their efforts. Curricular impediments to effective teaching include unclear definitions of and disagreement on learning needs, misunderstood or unstated goals and objectives, and curriculum sequencing challenges. Student and faculty attitudes, too few faculty development opportunities, and the lack of an award system for teaching all are major culture-based barriers. Environmental barriers, such as time limitations, the setting, and the physical space in which medical education takes place, and financial barriers, such as limited education budgets, also pose serious challenges to even the most committed teachers. This article delineates the barriers to effective teaching as noted in the literature and recommends action items, some of which are incremental whereas others represent major change. Physicians-in-training, medical faculty, and society are depending on medical education leaders to address these barriers to effect the changes needed to enhance teaching and learning.",
author = "DaRosa, {Debra A.} and Kelley Skeff and Friedland, {Joan A.} and Michael Coburn and Susan Cox and Susan Pollart and Mark O'connell and Sandy Smith",
year = "2011",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1097/ACM.0b013e31820defbe",
language = "English",
volume = "86",
pages = "453--459",
journal = "Academic Medicine",
issn = "1040-2446",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Barriers to effective teaching

AU - DaRosa, Debra A.

AU - Skeff, Kelley

AU - Friedland, Joan A.

AU - Coburn, Michael

AU - Cox, Susan

AU - Pollart, Susan

AU - O'connell, Mark

AU - Smith, Sandy

PY - 2011/4/1

Y1 - 2011/4/1

N2 - Medical school faculty members are charged with the critical responsibility of preparing the future physician and medical scientist workforce. Recent reports suggest that medical school curricula have not kept pace with societal needs and that medical schools are graduating students who lack the knowledge and skills needed to practice effectively in the 21st century. The majority of faculty members want to be effective teachers and graduate well-prepared medical students, but multiple and complex factors-curricular, cultural, environmental, and financial-impede their efforts. Curricular impediments to effective teaching include unclear definitions of and disagreement on learning needs, misunderstood or unstated goals and objectives, and curriculum sequencing challenges. Student and faculty attitudes, too few faculty development opportunities, and the lack of an award system for teaching all are major culture-based barriers. Environmental barriers, such as time limitations, the setting, and the physical space in which medical education takes place, and financial barriers, such as limited education budgets, also pose serious challenges to even the most committed teachers. This article delineates the barriers to effective teaching as noted in the literature and recommends action items, some of which are incremental whereas others represent major change. Physicians-in-training, medical faculty, and society are depending on medical education leaders to address these barriers to effect the changes needed to enhance teaching and learning.

AB - Medical school faculty members are charged with the critical responsibility of preparing the future physician and medical scientist workforce. Recent reports suggest that medical school curricula have not kept pace with societal needs and that medical schools are graduating students who lack the knowledge and skills needed to practice effectively in the 21st century. The majority of faculty members want to be effective teachers and graduate well-prepared medical students, but multiple and complex factors-curricular, cultural, environmental, and financial-impede their efforts. Curricular impediments to effective teaching include unclear definitions of and disagreement on learning needs, misunderstood or unstated goals and objectives, and curriculum sequencing challenges. Student and faculty attitudes, too few faculty development opportunities, and the lack of an award system for teaching all are major culture-based barriers. Environmental barriers, such as time limitations, the setting, and the physical space in which medical education takes place, and financial barriers, such as limited education budgets, also pose serious challenges to even the most committed teachers. This article delineates the barriers to effective teaching as noted in the literature and recommends action items, some of which are incremental whereas others represent major change. Physicians-in-training, medical faculty, and society are depending on medical education leaders to address these barriers to effect the changes needed to enhance teaching and learning.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=79955109372&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=79955109372&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/ACM.0b013e31820defbe

DO - 10.1097/ACM.0b013e31820defbe

M3 - Article

C2 - 21346500

AN - SCOPUS:79955109372

VL - 86

SP - 453

EP - 459

JO - Academic Medicine

JF - Academic Medicine

SN - 1040-2446

IS - 4

ER -