Band saw injury in a butcher

Lee Eric Rubin, Roberto Miki, Sudeep Taksali, Richard Alan Bernstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: While treating an unusual amputation caused by a meat band saw in a 35-year-old butcher, we sought information from the medical literature that would be useful to other physicians who might encounter similar occupational injuries. Methods: Using the Medline database and relevant search terms, we reviewed the literature concerning occupational saw blade injuries and porcine microbiology as they related to this injury. Results: Among meat workers using powered cutting equipment, hand injuries and distal fingertip amputations appear to be common. The greatest risk for a wound infection after open exposure to raw pork meat appears primarily related to environmental flora rather than enteric-borne porcine pathogens. Conclusions: Decision-making strategy when formulating a treatment plan for debridement or reconstruction of saw blade amputations should rely on a detailed understanding of the injury and occupational environment to achieve an optimal patient outcome. When considering operative and antibiotic treatment for porcine meat-related amputation injury, surgeons should adhere to open fracture-related guidelines, since porcine-borne illnesses are most often caused by ingestion rather than transcutaneous inoculation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)383-385
Number of pages3
JournalOccupational Medicine
Volume57
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Amputation
Meat
Swine
Occupational Injuries
Wounds and Injuries
Hand Injuries
Open Fractures
Debridement
Wound Infection
Microbiology
Decision Making
Eating
Databases
Guidelines
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Physicians
Equipment and Supplies
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Band saw
  • Butcher
  • Meatpacking
  • Occupational accident
  • Pork

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Rubin, L. E., Miki, R., Taksali, S., & Bernstein, R. A. (2007). Band saw injury in a butcher. Occupational Medicine, 57(5), 383-385. https://doi.org/10.1093/occmed/kqm019

Band saw injury in a butcher. / Rubin, Lee Eric; Miki, Roberto; Taksali, Sudeep; Bernstein, Richard Alan.

In: Occupational Medicine, Vol. 57, No. 5, 01.08.2007, p. 383-385.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rubin, LE, Miki, R, Taksali, S & Bernstein, RA 2007, 'Band saw injury in a butcher', Occupational Medicine, vol. 57, no. 5, pp. 383-385. https://doi.org/10.1093/occmed/kqm019
Rubin LE, Miki R, Taksali S, Bernstein RA. Band saw injury in a butcher. Occupational Medicine. 2007 Aug 1;57(5):383-385. https://doi.org/10.1093/occmed/kqm019
Rubin, Lee Eric ; Miki, Roberto ; Taksali, Sudeep ; Bernstein, Richard Alan. / Band saw injury in a butcher. In: Occupational Medicine. 2007 ; Vol. 57, No. 5. pp. 383-385.
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