B cell regulation of antitumor response

Ahmed Al Bayati, Yu Zhang, Joseph D Rosenblatt

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

While the role of CD4+ T cells, cytolytic T cells, natural killer cells, and Th1 response in antitumor immunity has been appreciated for decades, a variety of human and murine tumors are heavily infiltrated with cells of B cell lineage. In contrast to the well-characterized role of T cells and adaptive immunity and of NK cells and the innate response in tumor rejection, as well as the suppressive role played by T-regulatory cells (Tregs), the role of B cells in the regulation of antitumor immunity is poorly understood. Increasing evidence points to a potential role of B cells in the suppression of immune responses in the context of malignancy. This includes a variety of murine models in which B cell infiltration has been associated with increased tumor growth, and even carcinogenesis, and the identification of subsets of B cells with unique regulatory properties. Several mechanisms have been implicated in B cell-mediated regulation of immune response. This includes preferential polarization of B cells along Th1 or Th2 pathways, the elaboration of immunosuppressive cytokines such as TGF-β and interleukin-10, B cell display of immunosuppressive co-stimulatory ligands such as CD86 and PD-L1, and/or B cell support for the development of Tregs within the tumor microenvironment. Evidence is also accumulating that malignant lymphoma and leukemia B cells may distort the balance between Tregs and so-called Th17 cells leading to a tumor microenvironment that is more conducive to lymphoma growth. The ability to target and even eradicate both normal and malignant B cells using monoclonal antibodies to CD19 and CD20 and using other means in the clinic suggest that B cell depletion may facilitate an antitumor immune response. Understanding mechanisms underlying B cell regulation of antitumor responses is therefore of paramount importance in developing new strategies for exploitation of antitumor immunity, and B cell-directed strategies may be applicable to both solid and lymphoid tumors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationCancer Immunology: Bench to Bedside Immunotherapy of Cancers
PublisherSpringer Berlin Heidelberg
Pages283-292
Number of pages10
ISBN (Print)9783662449462, 9783662449455
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

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B-Lymphocytes
Regulatory T-Lymphocytes
Immunity
Tumor Microenvironment
Neoplasms
Immunosuppressive Agents
T-Lymphocytes
Natural Killer Cells
Lymphoma
B-Cell Leukemia
B-Lymphocyte Subsets
Th17 Cells
Adaptive Immunity
Cell Lineage
Growth
Interleukin-10
Carcinogenesis
Monoclonal Antibodies
Cytokines
Ligands

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)

Cite this

Al Bayati, A., Zhang, Y., & Rosenblatt, J. D. (2015). B cell regulation of antitumor response. In Cancer Immunology: Bench to Bedside Immunotherapy of Cancers (pp. 283-292). Springer Berlin Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-662-44946-2_15

B cell regulation of antitumor response. / Al Bayati, Ahmed; Zhang, Yu; Rosenblatt, Joseph D.

Cancer Immunology: Bench to Bedside Immunotherapy of Cancers. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2015. p. 283-292.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Al Bayati, A, Zhang, Y & Rosenblatt, JD 2015, B cell regulation of antitumor response. in Cancer Immunology: Bench to Bedside Immunotherapy of Cancers. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, pp. 283-292. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-662-44946-2_15
Al Bayati A, Zhang Y, Rosenblatt JD. B cell regulation of antitumor response. In Cancer Immunology: Bench to Bedside Immunotherapy of Cancers. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. 2015. p. 283-292 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-662-44946-2_15
Al Bayati, Ahmed ; Zhang, Yu ; Rosenblatt, Joseph D. / B cell regulation of antitumor response. Cancer Immunology: Bench to Bedside Immunotherapy of Cancers. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2015. pp. 283-292
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