Axonal regeneration after spinal cord injury in zebrafish and mammals: Differences, similarities, translation

Katarina Vajn, Jeffery A. Plunkett, Alexis Tapanes-Castillo, Martin Oudega

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Spinal cord injury (SCI) in mammals results in functional deficits that are mostly permanent due in part to the inability of severed axons to regenerate. Several types of growth-inhibitory molecules expressed at the injury site contribute to this regeneration failure. The responses of axons to these inhibitors vary greatly within and between organisms, reflecting axons' characteristic intrinsic propensity for regeneration. In the zebrafish (Danio rerio) many but not all axons exhibit successful regeneration after SCI. This review presents and compares the intrinsic and extrinsic determinants of axonal regeneration in the injured spinal cord in mammals and zebrafish. A better understanding of the molecules and molecular pathways underlying the remarkable individualism among neurons in mature zebrafish may support the development of therapies for SCI and their translation to the clinic.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)402-410
Number of pages9
JournalNeuroscience Bulletin
Volume29
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Zebrafish
Spinal Cord Injuries
Axons
Regeneration
Mammals
Spinal Cord
Neurons
Wounds and Injuries
Growth
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • axonal regeneration
  • functional recovery
  • growth inhibition
  • spinal cord injury
  • zebrafish

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Axonal regeneration after spinal cord injury in zebrafish and mammals : Differences, similarities, translation. / Vajn, Katarina; Plunkett, Jeffery A.; Tapanes-Castillo, Alexis; Oudega, Martin.

In: Neuroscience Bulletin, Vol. 29, No. 4, 08.2013, p. 402-410.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Vajn, Katarina ; Plunkett, Jeffery A. ; Tapanes-Castillo, Alexis ; Oudega, Martin. / Axonal regeneration after spinal cord injury in zebrafish and mammals : Differences, similarities, translation. In: Neuroscience Bulletin. 2013 ; Vol. 29, No. 4. pp. 402-410.
@article{1083b69a44a2441891d55ee90aba7e01,
title = "Axonal regeneration after spinal cord injury in zebrafish and mammals: Differences, similarities, translation",
abstract = "Spinal cord injury (SCI) in mammals results in functional deficits that are mostly permanent due in part to the inability of severed axons to regenerate. Several types of growth-inhibitory molecules expressed at the injury site contribute to this regeneration failure. The responses of axons to these inhibitors vary greatly within and between organisms, reflecting axons' characteristic intrinsic propensity for regeneration. In the zebrafish (Danio rerio) many but not all axons exhibit successful regeneration after SCI. This review presents and compares the intrinsic and extrinsic determinants of axonal regeneration in the injured spinal cord in mammals and zebrafish. A better understanding of the molecules and molecular pathways underlying the remarkable individualism among neurons in mature zebrafish may support the development of therapies for SCI and their translation to the clinic.",
keywords = "axonal regeneration, functional recovery, growth inhibition, spinal cord injury, zebrafish",
author = "Katarina Vajn and Plunkett, {Jeffery A.} and Alexis Tapanes-Castillo and Martin Oudega",
year = "2013",
month = "8",
doi = "10.1007/s12264-013-1361-8",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "29",
pages = "402--410",
journal = "Neuroscience Bulletin",
issn = "1673-7067",
publisher = "Science Press",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Axonal regeneration after spinal cord injury in zebrafish and mammals

T2 - Differences, similarities, translation

AU - Vajn, Katarina

AU - Plunkett, Jeffery A.

AU - Tapanes-Castillo, Alexis

AU - Oudega, Martin

PY - 2013/8

Y1 - 2013/8

N2 - Spinal cord injury (SCI) in mammals results in functional deficits that are mostly permanent due in part to the inability of severed axons to regenerate. Several types of growth-inhibitory molecules expressed at the injury site contribute to this regeneration failure. The responses of axons to these inhibitors vary greatly within and between organisms, reflecting axons' characteristic intrinsic propensity for regeneration. In the zebrafish (Danio rerio) many but not all axons exhibit successful regeneration after SCI. This review presents and compares the intrinsic and extrinsic determinants of axonal regeneration in the injured spinal cord in mammals and zebrafish. A better understanding of the molecules and molecular pathways underlying the remarkable individualism among neurons in mature zebrafish may support the development of therapies for SCI and their translation to the clinic.

AB - Spinal cord injury (SCI) in mammals results in functional deficits that are mostly permanent due in part to the inability of severed axons to regenerate. Several types of growth-inhibitory molecules expressed at the injury site contribute to this regeneration failure. The responses of axons to these inhibitors vary greatly within and between organisms, reflecting axons' characteristic intrinsic propensity for regeneration. In the zebrafish (Danio rerio) many but not all axons exhibit successful regeneration after SCI. This review presents and compares the intrinsic and extrinsic determinants of axonal regeneration in the injured spinal cord in mammals and zebrafish. A better understanding of the molecules and molecular pathways underlying the remarkable individualism among neurons in mature zebrafish may support the development of therapies for SCI and their translation to the clinic.

KW - axonal regeneration

KW - functional recovery

KW - growth inhibition

KW - spinal cord injury

KW - zebrafish

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84881172973&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84881172973&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s12264-013-1361-8

DO - 10.1007/s12264-013-1361-8

M3 - Article

C2 - 23893428

AN - SCOPUS:84881172973

VL - 29

SP - 402

EP - 410

JO - Neuroscience Bulletin

JF - Neuroscience Bulletin

SN - 1673-7067

IS - 4

ER -