Availability of Commonly Consumed and Culturally Specific Fruits and Vegetables in African-American and Latino Neighborhoods

Diana S. Grigsby-Toussaint, Shannon N. Zenk, Angela Odoms-Young, Laurie Ruggiero, Imelda Moise

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

59 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although the importance of culture in shaping individual dietary behaviors is well-documented, cultural food preferences have received limited attention in research on the neighborhood food environment. The purpose of this study was to assess the availability of commonly consumed and culturally specific fruits and vegetables in retail food stores located in majority African-American and Latino neighborhoods in southwest Chicago, IL. A cross-sectional survey of 115 stores (15% grocery stores, 85% convenience/corner stores) in African-American neighborhoods and 110 stores (45% grocery stores, 55% convenience/corner stores) in Latino neighborhoods was conducted between May and August of 2006. χ2 tests were used to assess differences in the availability (presence/absence) of commonly consumed (n=25) and culturally specific fruits and vegetables for African Americans (n=16 varieties) and Latinos (n=18 varieties). Stores located in neighborhoods in which the majority of residents were African American or Latino were more likely to carry fresh fruits and vegetables that were culturally relevant to the dominant group. For example, grocery stores located in Latino neighborhoods were more likely to carry chayote (82.0% vs 17.6%, P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)746-752
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American Dietetic Association
Volume110
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2010
Externally publishedYes

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African Americans
Hispanic Americans
Vegetables
Fruit
grocery stores
vegetables
fruits
Sechium edule
food storage
traditional foods
raw vegetables
Food Preferences
Food
raw fruit
eating habits
food choices
cross-sectional studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Research
testing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Availability of Commonly Consumed and Culturally Specific Fruits and Vegetables in African-American and Latino Neighborhoods. / Grigsby-Toussaint, Diana S.; Zenk, Shannon N.; Odoms-Young, Angela; Ruggiero, Laurie; Moise, Imelda.

In: Journal of the American Dietetic Association, Vol. 110, No. 5, 05.2010, p. 746-752.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Grigsby-Toussaint, Diana S. ; Zenk, Shannon N. ; Odoms-Young, Angela ; Ruggiero, Laurie ; Moise, Imelda. / Availability of Commonly Consumed and Culturally Specific Fruits and Vegetables in African-American and Latino Neighborhoods. In: Journal of the American Dietetic Association. 2010 ; Vol. 110, No. 5. pp. 746-752.
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