Autoreactive T cells in type 1 diabetes

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a chronic autoimmune disease that causes severe loss of pancreatic β cells. Autoreactive T cells are key mediators of β cell destruction. Studies of organ donors with T1D that have examined T cells in pancreas, the diabetogenic insulitis lesion, and lymphoid tissues have revealed a broad repertoire of target antigens and T cell receptor (TCR) usage, with initial evidence of public TCR sequences that are shared by individuals with T1D. Neoepitopes derived from post-translational modifications of native antigens are emerging as novel targets that are more likely to evade self-tolerance. Further studies will determine whether T cell responses to neoepitopes are major disease drivers that could impact prediction, prevention, and therapy. This Review provides an overview of recent progress in our knowledge of autoreactive T cells that has emerged from experimental and clinical research as well as pathology investigations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2881-2891
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Clinical Investigation
Volume127
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2017

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Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
T-Lymphocytes
T-Cell Antigen Receptor
Self Tolerance
Lymphoid Tissue
Post Translational Protein Processing
Autoimmune Diseases
Pancreas
Chronic Disease
Tissue Donors
Pathology
Antigens
Research
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Autoreactive T cells in type 1 diabetes. / Pugliese, Alberto.

In: Journal of Clinical Investigation, Vol. 127, No. 8, 01.08.2017, p. 2881-2891.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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