Automated respiratory support in newborn infants

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

A considerable proportion of premature infants requires mechanical ventilatory support and supplemental oxygen. Due to their immaturity, exposure to these forms of respiratory support contributes to the development of lung injury, oxidative stress and abnormal retinal development. These conditions are associated with poor long-term respiratory and neurological outcome. Mechanically ventilated preterm infants present with frequent fluctuations in ventilation and gas exchange. Currently available ventilatory modes and manual adjustment to the ventilator or supplemental oxygen cannot effectively adapt to these recurrent fluctuations. Moreover, the respiratory support often exceeds the infant's real needs. Techniques that adapt the mechanical ventilatory support and supplemental oxygen to the changing needs of preterm infants are being developed in order to improve stability of gas exchange, to minimise respiratory support and to reduce personnel workload. This article describes the preliminary evidence on the application of these new techniques in preterm infants and animal models.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)35-41
Number of pages7
JournalSeminars in Fetal and Neonatal Medicine
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2009

Keywords

  • Adaptive ventilation
  • Arterial oxygen saturation
  • Closed-loop oxygen control
  • Mechanical ventilation
  • Oxygen therapy
  • Preterm infant
  • Targeted minute ventilation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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