Attitudes Toward Depression Among Rehabilitation Participants With Acute Stroke: Evidence of an Age Cohort Effect

Patricia R. Roger, Doug Johnson-Greene

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose/Objective: Depression is commonplace after acute stroke and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. No data exist regarding attitudes about depression among older persons with acute stroke and their potential impact on self-report of depressive symptoms. The objective of this study was to determine if attitudes toward depression affect depression symptom reporting. Research Method/Design: Cross-sectional using data from an inpatient rehabilitation unit. Seventy-two people with acute stroke were surveyed regarding their attitudes toward depression as part of a larger battery assessing their cognitive and emotional functioning. Results: Both age and cognitive status were significant predictors of attitudes toward depression. Older participants expressed significantly more negative attitudes about depression and seeking professional help compared with younger participants. Those with higher cognitive scores held more positive attitudes. However, attitudes about depression were unrelated to participants' responses on self-report measures of depression. Conclusions/Implications: Participants with stroke who were older were more likely to report negative attitudes about depressive symptoms than were younger participants. However, these attitudes do not appear to represent a barrier to their ability to accurately report the presence and severity of depressive symptoms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)210-214
Number of pages5
JournalRehabilitation Psychology
Volume53
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2008

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Keywords

  • attitudes
  • depression
  • older persons
  • rehabilitation
  • stroke

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Health Professions(all)
  • Clinical Psychology

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