Attitudes and practices of Japanese and American music teachers towards integrating music with other subjects

Stephen F. Zdzinski, Masafumi Ogawa, Charlene Dell, Ching Ching Yap, Cedric Adderley, Rosetta Dingle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to compare attitudes and practices among general music teachers in Japan (n = 135) and the USA (n = 136) concerning the integration of music with other academic subjects. Teachers completed a researcher-designed questionnaire, and results revealed significant differences in both areas. Music teachers from the USA obtained higher attitude ratings towards the use of music integration, while music teachers in Japan integrated music with other subjects to a lesser extent. Teachers in both countries were most likely to integrate music with reading, language, science and math. History and social science integration with music was the least common area of integration among Japanese music teachers, while among American music teachers the practice of integrating music into history and social science content was more common. Several of the attitude correlations (i.e. science and mathematics integration, art integration) were not significantly related among Japanese teachers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)55-70
Number of pages16
JournalInternational Journal of Music Education
Volume25
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2007

Keywords

  • Cross-cultural
  • Curriculum
  • Interdisciplinary
  • National Standards
  • Teacher characteristics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Music

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