Attitudes and perceptions of AIDS clinical trials group site coordinators on HIV clinical trial recruitment and retention

A descriptive study

William D. King, Donna Defreitas, Kimberly Smith, Janet Andersen, Lisa Patton Perry, Toyin Adeyemi, Jennifer Mitty, Jan Fritsche, Carrie Jeffries, Melvin Littles, Margaret A Fischl, Gregory Pavlov, Donna Mildvan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

HIV-seropositive blacks, Hispanics, women of all ethnicities, and injection drug users (IDUs) have low rates of clinical trial participation. The opinions of research nurses and study coordinators as potential facilitators and barriers to access to clinical trials may contribute to this disparity. Study coordinators and research nurses from the adult AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG) clinical trials units responded to an anonymous computer-based survey comprising multiple choice questions and clinical scenarios. Descriptive statistics were used to determine frequencies of responses. Recruitment rates of blacks, Hispanics, women and IDUs were mostly rated appropriate compared with the geographic region demographics. Most sites ranked white men as being the most interested in clinical trials. Sites rated their most effective interactions were with white men. Respondents felt they were less likely to enroll individuals who had missed previous clinical appointments or did not speak English. Perceptions that IDUs, Hispanics, blacks, and, to a lesser extent, women had less interest in clinical trials participation than white males may affect recruitment of the targeted populations. Interventions to improve interactions with targeted populations and to remove logistical and language barriers may improve the diversity of clinical trial participants.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)551-563
Number of pages13
JournalAIDS Patient Care and STDs
Volume21
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2007

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Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Clinical Trials
HIV
Drug Users
Hispanic Americans
Injections
Nurses
Communication Barriers
Research
Population
Appointments and Schedules
Demography
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Leadership and Management
  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Attitudes and perceptions of AIDS clinical trials group site coordinators on HIV clinical trial recruitment and retention : A descriptive study. / King, William D.; Defreitas, Donna; Smith, Kimberly; Andersen, Janet; Perry, Lisa Patton; Adeyemi, Toyin; Mitty, Jennifer; Fritsche, Jan; Jeffries, Carrie; Littles, Melvin; Fischl, Margaret A; Pavlov, Gregory; Mildvan, Donna.

In: AIDS Patient Care and STDs, Vol. 21, No. 8, 01.08.2007, p. 551-563.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

King, WD, Defreitas, D, Smith, K, Andersen, J, Perry, LP, Adeyemi, T, Mitty, J, Fritsche, J, Jeffries, C, Littles, M, Fischl, MA, Pavlov, G & Mildvan, D 2007, 'Attitudes and perceptions of AIDS clinical trials group site coordinators on HIV clinical trial recruitment and retention: A descriptive study', AIDS Patient Care and STDs, vol. 21, no. 8, pp. 551-563. https://doi.org/10.1089/apc.2006.0173
King, William D. ; Defreitas, Donna ; Smith, Kimberly ; Andersen, Janet ; Perry, Lisa Patton ; Adeyemi, Toyin ; Mitty, Jennifer ; Fritsche, Jan ; Jeffries, Carrie ; Littles, Melvin ; Fischl, Margaret A ; Pavlov, Gregory ; Mildvan, Donna. / Attitudes and perceptions of AIDS clinical trials group site coordinators on HIV clinical trial recruitment and retention : A descriptive study. In: AIDS Patient Care and STDs. 2007 ; Vol. 21, No. 8. pp. 551-563.
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