Attentional bias and mood persistence as prospective predictors of dysphoria

Christopher G. Beevers, Charles S Carver

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

110 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined whether either a negative attentional bias or mood persistence would interact with intervening life stress to predict future increases in dysphoria among college students (N = 77). Dysphoria was assessed in the lab, and then attentional bias was measured with a dot-probe task before and after a negative mood induction. Mood recovery following the induction was also assessed. Seven weeks later, dysphoria and intervening life stress were measured. Prior shifts in attention toward negative information following a negative mood induction interacted with intervening life stress to predict increases in dysphoria 7 weeks later. Slower mood recovery following the mood induction also combined with intervening life stress to predict increased dysphoria at follow-up. These vulnerabilities each explained unique variance in follow-up dysphoria. Results suggest that both attentional bias and mood persistence may have significant roles in depression susceptibility.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)619-637
Number of pages19
JournalCognitive Therapy and Research
Volume27
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2003

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Psychological Stress
Attentional Bias
Depression
Students

Keywords

  • Cognitive bias
  • Depression vulnerability
  • Dot-probe
  • Information processing
  • Mood regulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Attentional bias and mood persistence as prospective predictors of dysphoria. / Beevers, Christopher G.; Carver, Charles S.

In: Cognitive Therapy and Research, Vol. 27, No. 6, 01.12.2003, p. 619-637.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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