Atherosclerotic disease of the proximal aorta and the risk of vascular events in a population-based cohort: The aortic plaques and risk of ischemic stroke (APRIS) study

Cesare Russo, Zhezhen Jin, Tatjana Rundek, Shunichi Homma, Ralph L Sacco, Marco R. Di Tullio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Proximal aortic plaques are a risk factor for vascular embolic events. However, this association in the general population is unclear. We sought to assess whether proximal aortic plaques are associated with vascular events in a community-based cohort. Methods-Stroke-free subjects from the Aortic Plaques and Risk of Ischemic Stroke (APRIS) study were evaluated. Aortic arch and proximal descending aortic plaques were assessed by transesophageal echocardiography (TEE). Vascular events (myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, vascular death) were prospectively recorded, and their association with aortic plaques was assessed. Results-209 subjects were studied (age 67.0±8.6 years). Aortic arch plaques were present in 130 subjects (62.2%), large plaques (≥4 mm) in 50 (23.9%). Descending aortic plaques were present in 126 subjects (60.9%), large plaques in 41 (19.8%). During a follow-up of 74.4±26.3 months, 29 events occurred (12 myocardial infarctions, 11 ischemic strokes, 6 vascular deaths). After adjustment for risk factors, large aortic arch plaques were not associated with combined vascular events (hazard ratio [HR] 1.03, 95% confidence intervals [CI] 0.35 to 3.02) or ischemic stroke (HR 0.59, 95% CI 0.10 to 3.39). Large descending aortic plaques were also not independently associated with vascular events (HR 1.99, 95% CI 0.52 to 7.69) or ischemic stroke (HR 1.43, 95% CI 0.27 to 7.48). Conclusions-In a population-based cohort, the incidental detection of plaques in the aortic arch or proximal descending aorta was not associated with future vascular events. Associated cofactors may affect the previously reported association between proximal aortic plaques and vascular events.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2313-2318
Number of pages6
JournalStroke
Volume40
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2009

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Blood Vessels
Aorta
Stroke
Thoracic Aorta
Population
Confidence Intervals
Myocardial Infarction
Transesophageal Echocardiography

Keywords

  • Atherosclerosis
  • Prognosis
  • Thoracic aorta
  • Thromboembolism
  • Transesophageal echocardiography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing

Cite this

Atherosclerotic disease of the proximal aorta and the risk of vascular events in a population-based cohort : The aortic plaques and risk of ischemic stroke (APRIS) study. / Russo, Cesare; Jin, Zhezhen; Rundek, Tatjana; Homma, Shunichi; Sacco, Ralph L; Di Tullio, Marco R.

In: Stroke, Vol. 40, No. 7, 01.07.2009, p. 2313-2318.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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title = "Atherosclerotic disease of the proximal aorta and the risk of vascular events in a population-based cohort: The aortic plaques and risk of ischemic stroke (APRIS) study",
abstract = "Proximal aortic plaques are a risk factor for vascular embolic events. However, this association in the general population is unclear. We sought to assess whether proximal aortic plaques are associated with vascular events in a community-based cohort. Methods-Stroke-free subjects from the Aortic Plaques and Risk of Ischemic Stroke (APRIS) study were evaluated. Aortic arch and proximal descending aortic plaques were assessed by transesophageal echocardiography (TEE). Vascular events (myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, vascular death) were prospectively recorded, and their association with aortic plaques was assessed. Results-209 subjects were studied (age 67.0±8.6 years). Aortic arch plaques were present in 130 subjects (62.2{\%}), large plaques (≥4 mm) in 50 (23.9{\%}). Descending aortic plaques were present in 126 subjects (60.9{\%}), large plaques in 41 (19.8{\%}). During a follow-up of 74.4±26.3 months, 29 events occurred (12 myocardial infarctions, 11 ischemic strokes, 6 vascular deaths). After adjustment for risk factors, large aortic arch plaques were not associated with combined vascular events (hazard ratio [HR] 1.03, 95{\%} confidence intervals [CI] 0.35 to 3.02) or ischemic stroke (HR 0.59, 95{\%} CI 0.10 to 3.39). Large descending aortic plaques were also not independently associated with vascular events (HR 1.99, 95{\%} CI 0.52 to 7.69) or ischemic stroke (HR 1.43, 95{\%} CI 0.27 to 7.48). Conclusions-In a population-based cohort, the incidental detection of plaques in the aortic arch or proximal descending aorta was not associated with future vascular events. Associated cofactors may affect the previously reported association between proximal aortic plaques and vascular events.",
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T1 - Atherosclerotic disease of the proximal aorta and the risk of vascular events in a population-based cohort

T2 - The aortic plaques and risk of ischemic stroke (APRIS) study

AU - Russo, Cesare

AU - Jin, Zhezhen

AU - Rundek, Tatjana

AU - Homma, Shunichi

AU - Sacco, Ralph L

AU - Di Tullio, Marco R.

PY - 2009/7/1

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N2 - Proximal aortic plaques are a risk factor for vascular embolic events. However, this association in the general population is unclear. We sought to assess whether proximal aortic plaques are associated with vascular events in a community-based cohort. Methods-Stroke-free subjects from the Aortic Plaques and Risk of Ischemic Stroke (APRIS) study were evaluated. Aortic arch and proximal descending aortic plaques were assessed by transesophageal echocardiography (TEE). Vascular events (myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, vascular death) were prospectively recorded, and their association with aortic plaques was assessed. Results-209 subjects were studied (age 67.0±8.6 years). Aortic arch plaques were present in 130 subjects (62.2%), large plaques (≥4 mm) in 50 (23.9%). Descending aortic plaques were present in 126 subjects (60.9%), large plaques in 41 (19.8%). During a follow-up of 74.4±26.3 months, 29 events occurred (12 myocardial infarctions, 11 ischemic strokes, 6 vascular deaths). After adjustment for risk factors, large aortic arch plaques were not associated with combined vascular events (hazard ratio [HR] 1.03, 95% confidence intervals [CI] 0.35 to 3.02) or ischemic stroke (HR 0.59, 95% CI 0.10 to 3.39). Large descending aortic plaques were also not independently associated with vascular events (HR 1.99, 95% CI 0.52 to 7.69) or ischemic stroke (HR 1.43, 95% CI 0.27 to 7.48). Conclusions-In a population-based cohort, the incidental detection of plaques in the aortic arch or proximal descending aorta was not associated with future vascular events. Associated cofactors may affect the previously reported association between proximal aortic plaques and vascular events.

AB - Proximal aortic plaques are a risk factor for vascular embolic events. However, this association in the general population is unclear. We sought to assess whether proximal aortic plaques are associated with vascular events in a community-based cohort. Methods-Stroke-free subjects from the Aortic Plaques and Risk of Ischemic Stroke (APRIS) study were evaluated. Aortic arch and proximal descending aortic plaques were assessed by transesophageal echocardiography (TEE). Vascular events (myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, vascular death) were prospectively recorded, and their association with aortic plaques was assessed. Results-209 subjects were studied (age 67.0±8.6 years). Aortic arch plaques were present in 130 subjects (62.2%), large plaques (≥4 mm) in 50 (23.9%). Descending aortic plaques were present in 126 subjects (60.9%), large plaques in 41 (19.8%). During a follow-up of 74.4±26.3 months, 29 events occurred (12 myocardial infarctions, 11 ischemic strokes, 6 vascular deaths). After adjustment for risk factors, large aortic arch plaques were not associated with combined vascular events (hazard ratio [HR] 1.03, 95% confidence intervals [CI] 0.35 to 3.02) or ischemic stroke (HR 0.59, 95% CI 0.10 to 3.39). Large descending aortic plaques were also not independently associated with vascular events (HR 1.99, 95% CI 0.52 to 7.69) or ischemic stroke (HR 1.43, 95% CI 0.27 to 7.48). Conclusions-In a population-based cohort, the incidental detection of plaques in the aortic arch or proximal descending aorta was not associated with future vascular events. Associated cofactors may affect the previously reported association between proximal aortic plaques and vascular events.

KW - Atherosclerosis

KW - Prognosis

KW - Thoracic aorta

KW - Thromboembolism

KW - Transesophageal echocardiography

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