Asymptomatic bacteriuria in adults

Richard Colgan, Lindsay E. Nicolle, Andrew Mcglone, Thomas Hooton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

99 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A common dilemma in clinical medicine is whether to treat asymptomatic patients who present with bacteria in their urine. There are few scenarios in which antibiotic treatment of asymptomatic bacteruria has been shown to improve patient outcomes. Because of increasing antimicrobial resistance, it is important not to treat patients with asymptomatic bacteriuria unless there is evidence of potential benefit. Women who are pregnant should be screened for asymptomatic bacteriuria in the first trimester and treated, if positive. Treating asymptomatic bacteriuria in patients with diabetes, older persons, patients with or without indwelling catheters, or patients with spinal cord injuries has not been found to improve outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)985-990
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Family Physician
Volume74
Issue number6
StatePublished - Sep 15 2006
Externally publishedYes

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Bacteriuria
Indwelling Catheters
Clinical Medicine
First Pregnancy Trimester
Spinal Cord Injuries
Pregnant Women
Urine
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Bacteria

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Colgan, R., Nicolle, L. E., Mcglone, A., & Hooton, T. (2006). Asymptomatic bacteriuria in adults. American Family Physician, 74(6), 985-990.

Asymptomatic bacteriuria in adults. / Colgan, Richard; Nicolle, Lindsay E.; Mcglone, Andrew; Hooton, Thomas.

In: American Family Physician, Vol. 74, No. 6, 15.09.2006, p. 985-990.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Colgan, R, Nicolle, LE, Mcglone, A & Hooton, T 2006, 'Asymptomatic bacteriuria in adults', American Family Physician, vol. 74, no. 6, pp. 985-990.
Colgan R, Nicolle LE, Mcglone A, Hooton T. Asymptomatic bacteriuria in adults. American Family Physician. 2006 Sep 15;74(6):985-990.
Colgan, Richard ; Nicolle, Lindsay E. ; Mcglone, Andrew ; Hooton, Thomas. / Asymptomatic bacteriuria in adults. In: American Family Physician. 2006 ; Vol. 74, No. 6. pp. 985-990.
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