Associations of prescription stimulant misuse with subsequent methamphetamine use among a U.S. cohort of HIV-vulnerable sexual and gender minorities who have sex with men

Drew A. Westmoreland, Jesse L. Goldshear, Adam W. Carrico, Christian Grov

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: Prescription stimulants and methamphetamine have similarities in chemical structure and impact on biological functioning. However, there is limited literature on prescription stimulant misuse among sexual and gender minorities as well as how prescription misuse may impact later methamphetamine use. Methods: We used data collected from a HIV prevention cohort to describe (e.g., frequencies, percentages) prescription stimulant use/misuse and methamphetamine use at baseline and 12-month follow-up (n = 4857). We then used multivariable logistic regression models to determine the impact of baseline prescription stimulant misuse and methamphetamine use on 12-month prescription stimulant misuse and methamphetamine use. Results: At baseline, 10.2 % of participants misused prescription stimulants and 12 % of participants used methamphetamine in the past 3 months, while at 12-month follow-up 11.6 % of participants misused prescription stimulants and 11.2 % of participants used methamphetamine in the past 3 months. Multivariable regression analyses indicated that participants who misused prescription stimulants (in the absence of methamphetamine) at baseline had 2.51 (95 % CI: 1.44–3.59, ref. no stimulant or methamphetamine use) times the odds of using methamphetamine at 12-month follow-up. Discussion: Findings suggest that prescription stimulant use is a risk factor for continued meth use. Therefore, earlier and targeted public health interventions could reduce methamphetamine use by disrupting the progression from prescription stimulant misuse to methamphetamine use through early screening and interventions for prescription stimulant misuse.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number108841
JournalDrug and Alcohol Dependence
Volume226
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2021

Keywords

  • Gay and bisexual men
  • Methamphetamine
  • Prescription stimulants
  • Sexual and gender minorities
  • Substance misuse

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Toxicology
  • Pharmacology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Pharmacology (medical)

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