Associations between perceived racial discrimination and tobacco cessation among diverse treatment seekers

Monica Webb Hooper, Patricia Calixte-Civil, Christina Verzijl, Karen O. Brandon, Taghrid Asfar, Tulay Koru-Sengul, Michael H. Antoni, David J. Lee, Vani N. Simmons, Thomas H. Brandon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: This study investigated a) racial/ethnic differences in past-year discrimination experiences and b) associations between discrimination and smoking abstinence. Design: Prospective, longitudinal analysis of smoking status. Perceived past-year discrimination was assessed at baseline. ANCOVAs and intent-to-treat hierarchical logistic regressions were conducted. Setting: Dual-site (Tampa, FL and Miami, FL) randomized controlled trial testing the effects of a group cessation intervention plus pharmacotherapy. Participants: Treatment-seeking adult smokers (N=347; non-Hispanic White, non-Hispanic African American/Black, or Hispanic). Main Outcome Measures: Biochemically verified 7-day point prevalence abstinence (7-day ppa) was assessed immediately postintervention and at 6-month follow-up. Results: After controlling for covariates, African Americans/Blacks reported greater perceived discrimination compared with non-Hispanic Whites (P=.02), and Hispanics (P=.06). Non-Hispanic Whites and Hispanics did not differ in perceived racial/ethnic discrimination experiences over the past year. Irrespective of race/ ethnicity, past-year perceived discrimination was inversely associated with 7-day ppa, both post-intervention (AOR=.97, CI: .95-.99) and at 6-months (AOR=.98, CI: .96-.99). Among African Americans/Blacks, past-year perceived discrimination was inversely associated with 7-day ppa, both post-intervention (AOR=.95, CI: .92-.97) and at 6-months (AOR=.97, CI: .94-.99). Perceived discrimination was unrelated to 7-day ppa among Hispanics. Among non-Hispanic Whites, past-year perceived discrimination was inversely associated with post-intervention 7-day ppa (AOR=.95, CI: .91-.99), but not 6-months. Conclusions: Perceived racial/ethnic discrimination was greater among African American/Black smokers compared with non-Hispanic Whites. Perceived discrimination was negatively associated with tobacco cessation in the full sample, and for African Americans at 6-months post-intervention. These data have implications for intervention delivery and health disparities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)411-420
Number of pages10
JournalEthnicity and Disease
Volume30
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2020

Keywords

  • African Americans
  • Ethnic Discrimination
  • Hispanics
  • Racial Discrimination
  • Smoking Cessation
  • Tobacco

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Associations between perceived racial discrimination and tobacco cessation among diverse treatment seekers'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this