Associations between neighborhood park space and cognition in older adults vary by US location: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis

Lilah M. Besser, Jana Hirsch, James E. Galvin, John Renne, Juyoung Park, Kelly R. Evenson, Joel D. Kaufman, Annette L. Fitzpatrick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

We used cross-sectional Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis data from six US cities/counties and adjusted multilevel linear regression to examine park space-cognition associations among non-demented older adults (n = 4084). We found that greater neighborhood park space 1-mile around the residence (measured continuously) was associated with better processing speed in the overall sample (estimate: 0.48; 95% CI: 0.03, 0.92). However, greater neighborhood park space (½-mile around residence) was associated with worse global cognition in Los Angeles, California (estimate: -2.66; 95% CI: -4.70, −0.62) and worse processing speed in Forsyth County, North Carolina (estimate: -0.72; 95% CI: -1.37, −0.08). Dichotomizing at the mean, having ≥6% park space (½-mile around residence) was associated with better global cognition in Saint Paul, Minnesota (estimate: 0.21; 95% CI: 0.05, 0.38), and better processing speed in New York City (estimate: 0.19; 95% CI: 0.04, 0.35). Park space-cognition associations varied by city/county, suggesting problems with pooling multiple sites without accounting for geographic context or regionally-varying park characteristics (e.g., quality).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number102459
JournalHealth and Place
Volume66
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2020

Keywords

  • Cognition
  • Cognitive
  • Neighborhood
  • Older adult
  • Park
  • Park space

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

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