Associations Between Neighborhood Characteristics, Social Cohesion, and Perceived Sex Partner Risk and Non-Monogamy Among HIV-Seropositive and HIV-Seronegative Women in the Southern U.S.

Danielle F. Haley, Gina M. Wingood, Michael R. Kramer, Regine Haardörfer, Adaora A. Adimora, Anna Rubtsova, Andrew Edmonds, Neela D. Goswami, Christina Ludema, De Marc A. Hickson, Catalina Ramirez, Zev Ross, Hector Bolivar, Hannah L.F. Cooper

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Neighborhood social and physical factors shape sexual network characteristics in HIV-seronegative adults in the U.S. This multilevel analysis evaluated whether these relationships also exist in a predominantly HIV-seropositive cohort of women. This cross-sectional multilevel analysis included data from 734 women enrolled in the Women’s Interagency HIV Study’s sites in the U.S. South. Census tract-level contextual data captured socioeconomic disadvantage (e.g., tract poverty), number of alcohol outlets, and number of non-profits in the census tracts where women lived; participant-level data, including perceived neighborhood cohesion, were gathered via survey. We used hierarchical generalized linear models to evaluate relationships between tract characteristics and two outcomes: perceived main sex partner risk level (e.g., partner substance use) and perceived main sex partner non-monogamy. We tested whether these relationships varied by women’s HIV status. Greater tract-level socioeconomic disadvantage was associated with greater sex partner risk (OR 1.29, 95% CI 1.06–1.58) among HIV-seropositive women and less partner non-monogamy among HIV-seronegative women (OR 0.69, 95% CI 0.51–0.92). Perceived neighborhood trust and cohesion was associated with lower partner risk (OR 0.83, 95% CI 0.69–1.00) for HIV-seropositive and HIV-seronegative women. The tract-level number of alcohol outlets and non-profits were not associated with partner risk characteristics. Neighborhood characteristics are associated with perceived sex partner risk and non-monogamy among women in the South; these relationships vary by HIV status. Future studies should examine causal relationships and explore the pathways through which neighborhoods influence partner selection and risk characteristics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-13
Number of pages13
JournalArchives of Sexual Behavior
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Apr 25 2018

Fingerprint

HIV
Multilevel Analysis
Censuses
Alcohols
Sociological Factors
Social Cohesion
AIDS/HIV
Women's Rights
Poverty
Linear Models
Cross-Sectional Studies

Keywords

  • HIV
  • Multilevel analyses
  • Neighborhood characteristics
  • Sexual risk
  • Social cohesion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Associations Between Neighborhood Characteristics, Social Cohesion, and Perceived Sex Partner Risk and Non-Monogamy Among HIV-Seropositive and HIV-Seronegative Women in the Southern U.S. / Haley, Danielle F.; Wingood, Gina M.; Kramer, Michael R.; Haardörfer, Regine; Adimora, Adaora A.; Rubtsova, Anna; Edmonds, Andrew; Goswami, Neela D.; Ludema, Christina; Hickson, De Marc A.; Ramirez, Catalina; Ross, Zev; Bolivar, Hector; Cooper, Hannah L.F.

In: Archives of Sexual Behavior, 25.04.2018, p. 1-13.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Haley, DF, Wingood, GM, Kramer, MR, Haardörfer, R, Adimora, AA, Rubtsova, A, Edmonds, A, Goswami, ND, Ludema, C, Hickson, DMA, Ramirez, C, Ross, Z, Bolivar, H & Cooper, HLF 2018, 'Associations Between Neighborhood Characteristics, Social Cohesion, and Perceived Sex Partner Risk and Non-Monogamy Among HIV-Seropositive and HIV-Seronegative Women in the Southern U.S.', Archives of Sexual Behavior, pp. 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10508-018-1205-8
Haley, Danielle F. ; Wingood, Gina M. ; Kramer, Michael R. ; Haardörfer, Regine ; Adimora, Adaora A. ; Rubtsova, Anna ; Edmonds, Andrew ; Goswami, Neela D. ; Ludema, Christina ; Hickson, De Marc A. ; Ramirez, Catalina ; Ross, Zev ; Bolivar, Hector ; Cooper, Hannah L.F. / Associations Between Neighborhood Characteristics, Social Cohesion, and Perceived Sex Partner Risk and Non-Monogamy Among HIV-Seropositive and HIV-Seronegative Women in the Southern U.S. In: Archives of Sexual Behavior. 2018 ; pp. 1-13.
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abstract = "Neighborhood social and physical factors shape sexual network characteristics in HIV-seronegative adults in the U.S. This multilevel analysis evaluated whether these relationships also exist in a predominantly HIV-seropositive cohort of women. This cross-sectional multilevel analysis included data from 734 women enrolled in the Women’s Interagency HIV Study’s sites in the U.S. South. Census tract-level contextual data captured socioeconomic disadvantage (e.g., tract poverty), number of alcohol outlets, and number of non-profits in the census tracts where women lived; participant-level data, including perceived neighborhood cohesion, were gathered via survey. We used hierarchical generalized linear models to evaluate relationships between tract characteristics and two outcomes: perceived main sex partner risk level (e.g., partner substance use) and perceived main sex partner non-monogamy. We tested whether these relationships varied by women’s HIV status. Greater tract-level socioeconomic disadvantage was associated with greater sex partner risk (OR 1.29, 95{\%} CI 1.06–1.58) among HIV-seropositive women and less partner non-monogamy among HIV-seronegative women (OR 0.69, 95{\%} CI 0.51–0.92). Perceived neighborhood trust and cohesion was associated with lower partner risk (OR 0.83, 95{\%} CI 0.69–1.00) for HIV-seropositive and HIV-seronegative women. The tract-level number of alcohol outlets and non-profits were not associated with partner risk characteristics. Neighborhood characteristics are associated with perceived sex partner risk and non-monogamy among women in the South; these relationships vary by HIV status. Future studies should examine causal relationships and explore the pathways through which neighborhoods influence partner selection and risk characteristics.",
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