Association of observed family relationship quality and problem-solving skills with treatment adherence in older children and adolescents with cystic fibrosis

Kirsten E. DeLambo, Carolyn E. Ievers-Landis, Dennis Drotar, Alexandra L. Quittner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

110 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To examine associations between observations of the quality of family relationships and problem-solving skills and reported adherence to medical treatments for older children and adolescents with cystic fibrosis (CF). Methods: Reports of adherence were obtained from 96 youth with CF and their parents recruited from six CF centers in the Midwest and southeastern United States. Videotaped observations of family discussions of high conflict issues were used to assess quality of relationships and problem-solving skills. Results: Hierarchical regression analyses indicated that observed family relationship quality (RQ) was related to parent and child reports of adherence to airway clearance and aerosolized medications after controlling for demographic variables and illness severity. Observed family problem solving was not a significant predictor after controlling for RQ. Conclusions: Older children and adolescents who come from families experiencing unhappy and conflicted relationships may be at greater risk for poor adherence to treatments; thus, family relationships are appropriate targets for interventions aimed at improving adherence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)343-353
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of pediatric psychology
Volume29
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2004
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Cystic fibrosis
  • Family relationship quality
  • Problem-solving skills
  • Treatment adherence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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