Association of distance from a transplant center with access to waitlist placement, receipt of liver transplantation, and survival among US Veterans

David S. Goldberg, Benjamin French, Kimberly A. Forde, Peter W. Groeneveld, Therese Bittermann, Lisa Backus, Scott D. Halpern, David E. Kaplan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

89 Scopus citations

Abstract

IMPORTANCE: Centralization of specialized health care services such as organ transplantation and bariatric surgery is advocated to improve quality, increase efficiency, and reduce cost. The effect of increased travel on access and outcomes from these services is not fully understood. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association between distance from a Veterans Affairs (VA) transplant center (VATC) and access to being waitlisted for liver transplantation, actually having a liver transplant, and mortality. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Retrospective study of veterans meeting liver transplantation eligibility criteria from January 1, 2003, until December 31, 2010, using data from the Veterans Health Administration's integrated, national, electronic medical record linked to Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network data. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: The primary outcomewas beingwaitlisted for transplantation at a VATC. Secondary outcomes included being waitlisted at any transplant center, undergoing a transplantation, and survival. RESULTS: From 2003-2010, 50 637 veterans were classified as potentially eligible for transplant; 2895 (6%) were waitlisted and 1418 of those were waitlisted (49%) at 1 of the 5 VATCs. Of 3417 veterans receiving care at a VA hospital located within 100 miles from a VATC, 244 (7.1%) were waitlisted at a VATC and 372 (10.9%) at any transplant center (VATC and non-VATCs). Of 47 219 veterans receiving care at a VA hospital located more than 100 miles from a VATC, 1174 (2.5%) were waitlisted at a VATC and 2523 (5.3%) at any transplant center (VATC and non-VATCs). In multivariable models, increasing distance to closest VATC was associated with significantly lower odds of being waitlisted at a VATC (odds ratio [OR], 0.91 [95%CI, 0.89-0.93] for each doubling in distance) or any transplant center (OR, 0.94 [95%CI, 0.92-0.96] for each doubling in distance). For example, a veteran living 25 miles from a VATC would have a 7.4%(95%CI, 6.6%-8.1%) adjusted probability of being waitlisted, whereas a veteran 100 miles from a VATC would have a 6.2%(95%CI, 5.7%-6.6%) adjusted probability. In adjusted models, increasing distance from a VATC was associated with significantly lower transplantation rates (subhazard ratio, 0.97; 95%CI, 0.95-0.98 for each doubling in distance). There was significantly increased mortality among waitlisted veterans from the time of first hepatic decompensation event in multivariable survival models (hazard ratio, 1.03; 95%CI, 1.01-1.04 for each doubling in distance). For example, a waitlisted veteran living 25 miles from a VATC would have a 62.9% (95%CI, 59.1%-66.1%) 5-year adjusted probability of survival from first hepatic decompensation event compared with a 59.8%(95%CI, 56.3%-63.1%) 5-year adjusted probability of survival for a veteran living 100 miles from a VATC. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Among VA patients meeting eligibility criteria for liver transplantation, greater distance from a VATC or any transplant center was associated with lower likelihood of being waitlisted, receiving a liver transplant, and greater likelihood of death. The relationship between these findings and centralizing specialized care deserves further investigation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1234-1243
Number of pages10
JournalJAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association
Volume311
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 26 2014
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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