Association between smoking cessation and weight gain in treatment-seeking African Americans

Marcia M. Tan, Kolawole S. Okuyemi, Ken Resnicow, Noella A. Dietz, Michael H. Antoni, Monica Webb Hooper

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction: Research has shown that African Americans gain more than average weight after smoking cessation. However, African Americans have been underrepresented in post-cessation weight gain research. The current study examined 1) the pattern of weight gain and 2) the association between smoking status and weight gain in a sample of African Americans seeking smoking cessation treatment. Methods: Data were drawn from a randomized controlled trial testing the efficacy of a 4-week culturally specific smoking cessation cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) intervention among African American smokers (N = 342). Weight was measured and self-reported smoking status was biochemically verified at baseline, end of counseling, 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-ups. Random effects multilevel modeling was used to examine weight gain over twelve months post CBT, and a fully unconditional model tested the pattern of weight gain over time. Smoking status was included as a time-varying factor to examine its effect on weight gain, controlling for potential confounding variables. Results: Weight significantly increased among those who remained abstinent over 12 months post CBT [average gain of seven lbs. (three kg)]. Controlling for covariates, abstinence was predictive of the rate of weight gain for those with high weight concern. Conclusions: Weight gain among African American abstainers was comparable to the average post-cessation weight gain observed among the general population. It is possible that exposure to CBT (culturally specific or standard) may have mitigated excessive weight gain. Future research should assess predictors of weight gain in African American smokers to inform future smoking cessation interventions and help elucidate factors that contribute to tobacco- and obesity-related health disparities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)84-90
Number of pages7
JournalAddictive Behaviors
Volume81
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2018

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Keywords

  • African American smokers
  • Ethnic minority health
  • Health disparities
  • Post-cessation weight gain
  • Smoking cessation
  • Weight concern

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Toxicology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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