Assessment of virtual reality robotic simulation performance by urology resident trainees

Raaj K. Ruparel, Abby S. Taylor, Janil Patel, Vipul R. Patel, Michael G. Heckman, Bhupendra Rawal, Raymond J. Leveillee, David D. Thiel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives To examine resident performance on the Mimic dV-Trainer (MdVT; Mimic Technologies, Inc., Seattle, WA) for correlation with resident trainee level (postgraduate year [PGY]), console experience (CE), and simulator exposure in their training program to assess for internal bias with the simulator. Design Residents from programs of the Southeastern Section of the American Urologic Association participated. Each resident was scored on 4 simulator tasks (peg board, camera targeting, energy dissection [ED], and needle targeting) with 3 different outcomes (final score, economy of motion score, and time to complete exercise) measured for each task. These scores were evaluated for association with PGY, CE, and simulator exposure. Setting Robotic skills training laboratory. Participants A total of 27 residents from 14 programs of the Southeastern Section of the American Urologic Association participated. Results Time to complete the ED exercise was significantly shorter for residents who had logged live robotic console compared with those who had not (p = 0.003). There were no other associations with live robotic console time that approached significance (all p ≤ 0.21). The only measure that was significantly associated with PGY was time to complete ED exercise (p = 0.009). No associations with previous utilization of a robotic simulator in the resident's home training program were statistically significant. Conclusions The ED exercise on the MdVT is most associated with CE and PGY compared with other exercises. Exposure of trainees to the MdVT in training programs does not appear to alter performance scores compared with trainees who do not have the simulator.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)302-308
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Surgical Education
Volume71
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Urology
Robotics
virtual reality
trainee
Dissection
resident
simulation
Education
performance
energy
training program
Needles
experience
Technology
utilization
economy
time
trend
tebufenozide

Keywords

  • resident training
  • robotic prostatectomy
  • robotic surgery
  • robotic training
  • simulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Education

Cite this

Ruparel, R. K., Taylor, A. S., Patel, J., Patel, V. R., Heckman, M. G., Rawal, B., ... Thiel, D. D. (2014). Assessment of virtual reality robotic simulation performance by urology resident trainees. Journal of Surgical Education, 71(3), 302-308. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsurg.2013.09.009

Assessment of virtual reality robotic simulation performance by urology resident trainees. / Ruparel, Raaj K.; Taylor, Abby S.; Patel, Janil; Patel, Vipul R.; Heckman, Michael G.; Rawal, Bhupendra; Leveillee, Raymond J.; Thiel, David D.

In: Journal of Surgical Education, Vol. 71, No. 3, 01.01.2014, p. 302-308.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ruparel, RK, Taylor, AS, Patel, J, Patel, VR, Heckman, MG, Rawal, B, Leveillee, RJ & Thiel, DD 2014, 'Assessment of virtual reality robotic simulation performance by urology resident trainees', Journal of Surgical Education, vol. 71, no. 3, pp. 302-308. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsurg.2013.09.009
Ruparel, Raaj K. ; Taylor, Abby S. ; Patel, Janil ; Patel, Vipul R. ; Heckman, Michael G. ; Rawal, Bhupendra ; Leveillee, Raymond J. ; Thiel, David D. / Assessment of virtual reality robotic simulation performance by urology resident trainees. In: Journal of Surgical Education. 2014 ; Vol. 71, No. 3. pp. 302-308.
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