Assessing the reliability and validity of the John Henry active coping scale in an urban sample of African Americans and white Americans

Anita F. Fernander, Ron E F Durán, Patrice Saab, Maria Llabre, Neil Schneiderman

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20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives. The primary focus of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the John Henry Active Coping scale (JHAC12) among an urban middle-aged sample of African Americans and white Americans. Design. The sample consisted of 75 African Americans and 129 white Americans from South Florida ranging in age from 25 to 54 years. Subjects completed the JHAC12, the Life Orientation Test (LOT), Coping Orientation to Problems Encountered (COPE) subscales, and the Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability scale. Results. Major findings supported the validity and reliability of the JHAC12 among both African Americans and white Americans. For both the African American and white American subsamples, the JHAC12 was correlated with the active coping and suppression of competing activities subscales of the COPE and negatively correlated with the Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability scale. In the African American subsample the JHAC12 was positively correlated with the LOT. The JHAC12 was also negatively associated with the behavioral disengagement subscale of the COPE among white Americans. Multiple regression analyses revealed that the proportion of variance in the JHAC12 explained by the various subscales of the COPE, Marlowe-Crowne, and the LOT was 43% for African Americans and 20% for white Americans. Factor analyses suggested two similar and meaningful factors among the African American and white American subsamples. Finally, Cronbach alpha reliabilities revealed similar subsample coefficients. Discussion. The implications of the findings are discussed in terms of the JHAC12's ability to assess the construct of active coping among African Americans and white Americans.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)147-161
Number of pages15
JournalEthnicity and Health
Volume8
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2003

Fingerprint

Reproducibility of Results
African Americans
coping
Social Desirability
social desirability
Aptitude
American
disengagement
suppression
Psychometrics
psychometrics
Statistical Factor Analysis
Regression Analysis
regression
ability

Keywords

  • African Americans
  • John Henry Active Coping scale
  • Reliability
  • Validity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Cultural Studies

Cite this

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title = "Assessing the reliability and validity of the John Henry active coping scale in an urban sample of African Americans and white Americans",
abstract = "Objectives. The primary focus of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the John Henry Active Coping scale (JHAC12) among an urban middle-aged sample of African Americans and white Americans. Design. The sample consisted of 75 African Americans and 129 white Americans from South Florida ranging in age from 25 to 54 years. Subjects completed the JHAC12, the Life Orientation Test (LOT), Coping Orientation to Problems Encountered (COPE) subscales, and the Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability scale. Results. Major findings supported the validity and reliability of the JHAC12 among both African Americans and white Americans. For both the African American and white American subsamples, the JHAC12 was correlated with the active coping and suppression of competing activities subscales of the COPE and negatively correlated with the Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability scale. In the African American subsample the JHAC12 was positively correlated with the LOT. The JHAC12 was also negatively associated with the behavioral disengagement subscale of the COPE among white Americans. Multiple regression analyses revealed that the proportion of variance in the JHAC12 explained by the various subscales of the COPE, Marlowe-Crowne, and the LOT was 43{\%} for African Americans and 20{\%} for white Americans. Factor analyses suggested two similar and meaningful factors among the African American and white American subsamples. Finally, Cronbach alpha reliabilities revealed similar subsample coefficients. Discussion. The implications of the findings are discussed in terms of the JHAC12's ability to assess the construct of active coping among African Americans and white Americans.",
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N2 - Objectives. The primary focus of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the John Henry Active Coping scale (JHAC12) among an urban middle-aged sample of African Americans and white Americans. Design. The sample consisted of 75 African Americans and 129 white Americans from South Florida ranging in age from 25 to 54 years. Subjects completed the JHAC12, the Life Orientation Test (LOT), Coping Orientation to Problems Encountered (COPE) subscales, and the Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability scale. Results. Major findings supported the validity and reliability of the JHAC12 among both African Americans and white Americans. For both the African American and white American subsamples, the JHAC12 was correlated with the active coping and suppression of competing activities subscales of the COPE and negatively correlated with the Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability scale. In the African American subsample the JHAC12 was positively correlated with the LOT. The JHAC12 was also negatively associated with the behavioral disengagement subscale of the COPE among white Americans. Multiple regression analyses revealed that the proportion of variance in the JHAC12 explained by the various subscales of the COPE, Marlowe-Crowne, and the LOT was 43% for African Americans and 20% for white Americans. Factor analyses suggested two similar and meaningful factors among the African American and white American subsamples. Finally, Cronbach alpha reliabilities revealed similar subsample coefficients. Discussion. The implications of the findings are discussed in terms of the JHAC12's ability to assess the construct of active coping among African Americans and white Americans.

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