Assessing the acceptability of self-sampling for HPV among haitian immigrant women: CBPR in action

Lindley Barbee, Erin Kobetz, Janelle Menard, Nicole Cook, Jenny Blanco, Betsy Barton, Pascale Auguste, Nathalie McKenzie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

53 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective To determine whether pairing self-sampling for HPV with community health workers (CHWs) is a culturally acceptable method for cervical cancer screening among Haitian immigrant women residing in Little Haiti, the predominately Haitian neighborhood in Miami, FL. Methods As part of a larger, ongoing community-based participatory research (CBPR) initiative in Little Haiti, Haitian CHWs recruited 246 eligible women to this study. Participants provided self-collected cervical specimens for HPV testing and answered a series of questions about their experience with self-sampling for HPV. Results The vast majority of women (97.6%) was comfortable using the self-sampler at home, would recommend this screening method to their friends and/or family members (98.4%), and described the sampler as easy to use (95.1%). Additionally, 97% of all self-collected specimens were deemed adequate for HPV testing. Conclusions When paired with CHWs, who are of Haitian descent and well respected in Little Haiti, selfsampling is a highly acceptable method of cervical screening for Haitian women in this ethnic enclave. This approach addresses critical access barriers, including poverty, language difficulties, and socioculturel concerns about modesty, that may similarly affect Pap smear utilization among other immigrant or medically underserved population sub-groups. Coupled with generally positive reviews of the device, the low rate of insufficient specimens for testing suggests that this device is promising for use in non-clinical settings.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)421-431
Number of pages11
JournalCancer Causes and Control
Volume21
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2010

Fingerprint

Community-Based Participatory Research
Haiti
Papanicolaou Test
Equipment and Supplies
Vulnerable Populations
Poverty
Early Detection of Cancer
Population Groups
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
Language

Keywords

  • Cervical smears
  • Cervix cancer healthcare disparities
  • Community health aides

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Assessing the acceptability of self-sampling for HPV among haitian immigrant women : CBPR in action. / Barbee, Lindley; Kobetz, Erin; Menard, Janelle; Cook, Nicole; Blanco, Jenny; Barton, Betsy; Auguste, Pascale; McKenzie, Nathalie.

In: Cancer Causes and Control, Vol. 21, No. 3, 01.03.2010, p. 421-431.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Barbee, L, Kobetz, E, Menard, J, Cook, N, Blanco, J, Barton, B, Auguste, P & McKenzie, N 2010, 'Assessing the acceptability of self-sampling for HPV among haitian immigrant women: CBPR in action', Cancer Causes and Control, vol. 21, no. 3, pp. 421-431. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10552-009-9474-0
Barbee, Lindley ; Kobetz, Erin ; Menard, Janelle ; Cook, Nicole ; Blanco, Jenny ; Barton, Betsy ; Auguste, Pascale ; McKenzie, Nathalie. / Assessing the acceptability of self-sampling for HPV among haitian immigrant women : CBPR in action. In: Cancer Causes and Control. 2010 ; Vol. 21, No. 3. pp. 421-431.
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