Assessing match and mismatch between practitioner-generated and standardized interview-generated diagnoses for clinic-referred children and adolescents

Amanda Doss, John R. Weisz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

102 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) is widely used in both clinical and research settings, little is known about agreement between clinician and standardized research diagnoses. Diagnoses generated by the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children (DISC-P-2.3) were compared with clinician-generated diagnoses for 245 referred youths. Agreement was poor for all individual disorders and broader diagnostic clusters. Agreement was higher for externalizing categories than for internalizing, but no association was found between agreement and child, family, or clinician characteristics. Clinicians were more likely than the DISC to assign 1 diagnosis and less likely to assign 0 diagnoses, suggesting that clinic policies may play a role. Implications for the use of the DSM across different settings are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)158-168
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology
Volume70
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 26 2002
Externally publishedYes

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Interviews
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Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Appointments and Schedules

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

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