Assessing gender differences in the relationship between religious coping responses and alcohol consumption

Neal Krause, Kenneth I. Pargament, Peter C. Hill, Gail Ironson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to see if the use of religious coping responses is associated with alcohol intake. In addition, tests are conducted to see if the relationship between religion and alcohol use varies by gender. Data from a recent nationwide survey (N = 2173) indicate that greater use of religious coping responses is associated with less alcohol consumption. The findings further reveal that even though women use religious coping responses more often than men, the relationship between the use of religious coping responses and alcohol consumption is stronger for men than for women. This suggests that, with respect to alcohol consumption, men may benefit more from using religious coping responses than women. The theoretical implications of these results are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)93-104
Number of pages12
JournalMental Health, Religion and Culture
Volume21
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2 2018

Keywords

  • Religious coping
  • alcohol use
  • gender differences

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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