Assessing a multi-component math intervention within a cognitive-behavioral framework on the word problem-solving responses of a diverse group of third graders

Sheri Kingsdorf, Jennifer Krawec

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

In third grade the focus on math word problems becomes prominent. In the limited third grade research, teacher-mediated explicit instruction with multiple exemplars, teaching students to use visual representations, and the incorporation of self-strategies, have proven effective. For these practices to reach their full potential though, their content must be relevant and provide for growth to mature mathematical concepts. Based on these conclusions, additional research was needed. Therefore, the focus of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a multi-component word problem-solving intervention with explicit instruction strategies, multiple exemplars, the teaching of student-generated visual representations, incorporation of a self-monitoring checklist, and Common Core State Standards’ appropriate curriculum. Within a multiple baseline across behaviors design, the study evaluated the paraphrasing, visualizing, and computing word problem-solving responses of 10 third graders identified as learning disabilities, at-risk, and/or ESOL. The study revealed that all students made gains in some behaviors related to problem solving. Results are discussed in relation to a cognitive-behavioral framework and individual student characteristics, including discussions of limitations and educational significance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number1160638
JournalCogent Education
Volume3
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

Keywords

  • At-risk
  • Elementary school
  • English for Speakers of other Languages (ESOL)
  • Explicit instruction
  • Inclusive instruction
  • Learning disabilities (LD)
  • Multiple exemplars
  • Self-monitoring
  • Single-subject research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

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