Assertiveness Training for Disabled Adults in Wheelchairs

Self-Report, Role-Play, and Activity Pattern Outcomes

Robert L. Glueckauf, Alexandra Quittner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Thirty-four physically disabled adults participated in an 11-week assertiveness training (AT) program. Ss were randomly assigned to either AT or a waiting-list (WL) condition. Each was asked to complete three self-report measures, a role-play test, and a social and recreational activity diary. The AT Ss showed significant improvements on both self-reported assertiveness and role-play performance from pre- to posttreatment, whereas WL controls showed no changes on these measures. No significant changes in frequency of social or recreational activities were found at posttest for either AT or control Ss. A mixed pattern of results was shown at 6-month follow-up. Posttest gains were maintained across all self-report measures of assertiveness and acceptance of disability, whereas role-play performance approached baseline levels at 6-month follow-up. Overall results support the use of AT in enhancing perceived social efficacy and interpersonal skill of physically disabled adults in wheelchairs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)419-425
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology
Volume60
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jun 1 1992
Externally publishedYes

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Assertiveness
Wheelchairs
Self Report
Waiting Lists
Disabled Persons
Education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Assertiveness Training for Disabled Adults in Wheelchairs : Self-Report, Role-Play, and Activity Pattern Outcomes. / Glueckauf, Robert L.; Quittner, Alexandra.

In: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, Vol. 60, No. 3, 01.06.1992, p. 419-425.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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