Are female red-winged blackbirds territorial?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Spacing behaviour of female red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus) was observed to determine whether resident females within a herem divide their mate's territory into sub-territories. Some results accorded with defence of sub-territories: (1) females were more aggressive (towards decoys and mounts) close to their own nests than further away; and (2) there was little overlap in the use of space betwee residents on a male's territory. Other results did not accord with defence of sub-territories: (1) when the nest site was eliminated from the analysis, spatial overlaps were large; (2) areas defended through aggression by different females overlapped greatly; and (3) areas defended through advertisement by different females overlapped greatly. I conclude that the spacing behaviour of female red-winged blackbirds does not meet a strict difinition of territoriality.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1381-1391
Number of pages11
JournalAnimal Behaviour
Volume34
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1986
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Agelaius phoeniceus
spacing
spatial distribution
territoriality
nest site
aggression
spatial analysis
nesting sites
nest
nests

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

Cite this

Are female red-winged blackbirds territorial? / Searcy, William.

In: Animal Behaviour, Vol. 34, No. 5, 01.01.1986, p. 1381-1391.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{f26b54adb0cd406390e34f81cba1a7c7,
title = "Are female red-winged blackbirds territorial?",
abstract = "Spacing behaviour of female red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus) was observed to determine whether resident females within a herem divide their mate's territory into sub-territories. Some results accorded with defence of sub-territories: (1) females were more aggressive (towards decoys and mounts) close to their own nests than further away; and (2) there was little overlap in the use of space betwee residents on a male's territory. Other results did not accord with defence of sub-territories: (1) when the nest site was eliminated from the analysis, spatial overlaps were large; (2) areas defended through aggression by different females overlapped greatly; and (3) areas defended through advertisement by different females overlapped greatly. I conclude that the spacing behaviour of female red-winged blackbirds does not meet a strict difinition of territoriality.",
author = "William Searcy",
year = "1986",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/S0003-3472(86)80209-3",
language = "English",
volume = "34",
pages = "1381--1391",
journal = "Animal Behaviour",
issn = "0003-3472",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Are female red-winged blackbirds territorial?

AU - Searcy, William

PY - 1986/1/1

Y1 - 1986/1/1

N2 - Spacing behaviour of female red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus) was observed to determine whether resident females within a herem divide their mate's territory into sub-territories. Some results accorded with defence of sub-territories: (1) females were more aggressive (towards decoys and mounts) close to their own nests than further away; and (2) there was little overlap in the use of space betwee residents on a male's territory. Other results did not accord with defence of sub-territories: (1) when the nest site was eliminated from the analysis, spatial overlaps were large; (2) areas defended through aggression by different females overlapped greatly; and (3) areas defended through advertisement by different females overlapped greatly. I conclude that the spacing behaviour of female red-winged blackbirds does not meet a strict difinition of territoriality.

AB - Spacing behaviour of female red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus) was observed to determine whether resident females within a herem divide their mate's territory into sub-territories. Some results accorded with defence of sub-territories: (1) females were more aggressive (towards decoys and mounts) close to their own nests than further away; and (2) there was little overlap in the use of space betwee residents on a male's territory. Other results did not accord with defence of sub-territories: (1) when the nest site was eliminated from the analysis, spatial overlaps were large; (2) areas defended through aggression by different females overlapped greatly; and (3) areas defended through advertisement by different females overlapped greatly. I conclude that the spacing behaviour of female red-winged blackbirds does not meet a strict difinition of territoriality.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0040127014&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0040127014&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0003-3472(86)80209-3

DO - 10.1016/S0003-3472(86)80209-3

M3 - Article

VL - 34

SP - 1381

EP - 1391

JO - Animal Behaviour

JF - Animal Behaviour

SN - 0003-3472

IS - 5

ER -