Aqueous misdirection after glaucoma drainage device implantation

David Greenfield, Celso Tello, Donald L. Budenz, Jeffrey M. Liebmann, Robert Ritch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To describe the clinical presentation, outcome, and possible underlying mechanism of aqueous misdirection after glaucoma drainage device implantation. Design: Retrospective, noncomparative, interventional case series. Participants: Ten eyes (five primary open-angle glaucoma, four chronic angle-closure glaucoma, one nanophthalmos) of nine patients with a mean age of 68.5 ± 12.0 years (range, 43-83 years). Intervention: The authors reviewed the medical records of all patients with a clinical diagnosis of aqueous misdirection after Baerveldt glaucoma drainage device implantation at two tertiary care referral centers from October 1992 to October 1997. Surgery was performed in a standardized fashion; all drainage tubes were inserted in the anterior chamber and occluded with an external 7-0 polyglactin ligature. All eyes were treated with topical corticosteroids, cycloplegia, and aqueous suppressants. Eyes with persistent aqueous misdirection received neodymium:YAG (Nd:YAG) hyaloidotomy or pars plana vitrectomy. Main Outcome Measures: Visual acuity, intraocular pressure, biomicroscopic anterior chamber depth, and antiglaucomatous medication. Results: All eyes had axial shallowing of the anterior chamber, one or more patent iridotomies, and no ophthalmoscopic or B-scan ultrasonographic evidence of serous or hemorrhagic ciliochoroidal detachment. Median time to the development of angle-closure glaucoma was 33.5 days (range, 1-343 days) and mean intraocular pressure at diagnosis was 27.7 ± 18.7 mmHg (range, 10- 62 mmHg). Normalization of anterior segment anatomy was achieved with aqueous suppression and cycloplegia (one eye); Nd:YAG capsulotomy (four eyes); pars plana vitrectomy alone (two eyes) or with lensectomy (one eye), and pars plana vitrectomy with intraocular lens explanation (two eyes). Mean final intraocular pressure was 14.1 ± 6.0 mmHg at a mean follow-up of 9.1 ± 7.8 months after the development of aqueous misdirection (range, 1-23 months). Conclusions: Aqueous misdirection may develop days to months after glaucoma drainage device implantation. In this series, there was a poor response to medical therapy, and normalization in anterior chamber depth required aggressive laser and surgical therapy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1035-1040
Number of pages6
JournalOphthalmology
Volume106
Issue number5
StatePublished - May 1 1999

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Glaucoma
Drainage
Equipment and Supplies
Anterior Chamber
Temazepam
Vitrectomy
Intraocular Pressure
Neodymium
Angle Closure Glaucoma
Tertiary Care Centers
Polyglactin 910
Intraocular Lenses
Laser Therapy
Visual Acuity
Medical Records
Ligation
Anatomy
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Greenfield, D., Tello, C., Budenz, D. L., Liebmann, J. M., & Ritch, R. (1999). Aqueous misdirection after glaucoma drainage device implantation. Ophthalmology, 106(5), 1035-1040.

Aqueous misdirection after glaucoma drainage device implantation. / Greenfield, David; Tello, Celso; Budenz, Donald L.; Liebmann, Jeffrey M.; Ritch, Robert.

In: Ophthalmology, Vol. 106, No. 5, 01.05.1999, p. 1035-1040.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Greenfield, D, Tello, C, Budenz, DL, Liebmann, JM & Ritch, R 1999, 'Aqueous misdirection after glaucoma drainage device implantation', Ophthalmology, vol. 106, no. 5, pp. 1035-1040.
Greenfield D, Tello C, Budenz DL, Liebmann JM, Ritch R. Aqueous misdirection after glaucoma drainage device implantation. Ophthalmology. 1999 May 1;106(5):1035-1040.
Greenfield, David ; Tello, Celso ; Budenz, Donald L. ; Liebmann, Jeffrey M. ; Ritch, Robert. / Aqueous misdirection after glaucoma drainage device implantation. In: Ophthalmology. 1999 ; Vol. 106, No. 5. pp. 1035-1040.
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