Application of solar electric propulsion to a comet surface sample return mission

Byoungsam Woo, Victoria Coverstone, Michael Cupples

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Current NASA solar electric propulsion technology application readiness and NASA's evolutionary xenon thruster-based propulsion systems are compared for a comet surface sample return mission to Tempel 1. Mission and systems analyses are conducted over a range of array power for each propulsion system and for two medium-class launch vehicles. Engine configurations investigated for NASA solar electric propulsion technology application readiness included five operational engines with one spare and six operational engines with one spare. The NASA evolutionary xenon thruster configuration investigated included two operational engines plus one spare, with performance estimated for two different throttling modes. Figures of merit for this comparison include solar electric propulsion dry mass, average engine throughput, and net nonpropulsion payload returned to Earth. For the comet surface sample return mission, the NASA evolutionary xenon thruster system outperforms the NASA solar electric propulsion technology application readiness system with the advantage of lighter dry mass and simpler hardware implementation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1225-1230
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Spacecraft and Rockets
Volume43
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

solar electric propulsion
sample return missions
Electric propulsion
comets
comet
NASA
engines
engine
xenon
Engines
Xenon
propulsion
Propulsion
throttling
launch vehicles
configurations
payloads
figure of merit
Launch vehicles
hardware

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aerospace Engineering
  • Space and Planetary Science

Cite this

Application of solar electric propulsion to a comet surface sample return mission. / Woo, Byoungsam; Coverstone, Victoria; Cupples, Michael.

In: Journal of Spacecraft and Rockets, Vol. 43, No. 6, 01.11.2006, p. 1225-1230.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{d0165845756c467896be2c9834ee9684,
title = "Application of solar electric propulsion to a comet surface sample return mission",
abstract = "Current NASA solar electric propulsion technology application readiness and NASA's evolutionary xenon thruster-based propulsion systems are compared for a comet surface sample return mission to Tempel 1. Mission and systems analyses are conducted over a range of array power for each propulsion system and for two medium-class launch vehicles. Engine configurations investigated for NASA solar electric propulsion technology application readiness included five operational engines with one spare and six operational engines with one spare. The NASA evolutionary xenon thruster configuration investigated included two operational engines plus one spare, with performance estimated for two different throttling modes. Figures of merit for this comparison include solar electric propulsion dry mass, average engine throughput, and net nonpropulsion payload returned to Earth. For the comet surface sample return mission, the NASA evolutionary xenon thruster system outperforms the NASA solar electric propulsion technology application readiness system with the advantage of lighter dry mass and simpler hardware implementation.",
author = "Byoungsam Woo and Victoria Coverstone and Michael Cupples",
year = "2006",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.2514/1.23371",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "43",
pages = "1225--1230",
journal = "Journal of Spacecraft and Rockets",
issn = "0022-4650",
publisher = "American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Inc. (AIAA)",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Application of solar electric propulsion to a comet surface sample return mission

AU - Woo, Byoungsam

AU - Coverstone, Victoria

AU - Cupples, Michael

PY - 2006/11/1

Y1 - 2006/11/1

N2 - Current NASA solar electric propulsion technology application readiness and NASA's evolutionary xenon thruster-based propulsion systems are compared for a comet surface sample return mission to Tempel 1. Mission and systems analyses are conducted over a range of array power for each propulsion system and for two medium-class launch vehicles. Engine configurations investigated for NASA solar electric propulsion technology application readiness included five operational engines with one spare and six operational engines with one spare. The NASA evolutionary xenon thruster configuration investigated included two operational engines plus one spare, with performance estimated for two different throttling modes. Figures of merit for this comparison include solar electric propulsion dry mass, average engine throughput, and net nonpropulsion payload returned to Earth. For the comet surface sample return mission, the NASA evolutionary xenon thruster system outperforms the NASA solar electric propulsion technology application readiness system with the advantage of lighter dry mass and simpler hardware implementation.

AB - Current NASA solar electric propulsion technology application readiness and NASA's evolutionary xenon thruster-based propulsion systems are compared for a comet surface sample return mission to Tempel 1. Mission and systems analyses are conducted over a range of array power for each propulsion system and for two medium-class launch vehicles. Engine configurations investigated for NASA solar electric propulsion technology application readiness included five operational engines with one spare and six operational engines with one spare. The NASA evolutionary xenon thruster configuration investigated included two operational engines plus one spare, with performance estimated for two different throttling modes. Figures of merit for this comparison include solar electric propulsion dry mass, average engine throughput, and net nonpropulsion payload returned to Earth. For the comet surface sample return mission, the NASA evolutionary xenon thruster system outperforms the NASA solar electric propulsion technology application readiness system with the advantage of lighter dry mass and simpler hardware implementation.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33846086347&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33846086347&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.2514/1.23371

DO - 10.2514/1.23371

M3 - Article

VL - 43

SP - 1225

EP - 1230

JO - Journal of Spacecraft and Rockets

JF - Journal of Spacecraft and Rockets

SN - 0022-4650

IS - 6

ER -