Application of biotic ligand and toxic unit modeling approaches to predict improvements in zooplankton species richness in smelter-damaged lakes near Sudbury, Ontario

Farhan R. Khan, W. Keller, Norman D. Yan, Paul G. Welsh, Chris M. Wood, James C. McGeer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Using a 30-year record of biological and water chemistry data collected from seven lakes near smelters in Sudbury (Ontario, Canada) we examined the link between reductions of Cu, Ni, and Zn concentrations and zooplankton species richness. The toxicity of the metal mixtures was assessed using an additive Toxic Unit (TU) approach. Four TU models were developed based on total metal concentrations (TM-TU); free ion concentrations (FI-TU); acute LC50s calculated from the Biotic Ligand Model (BLM-TU); and chronic LC50s (acute LC50s adjusted by metal-specific acute-to-chronic ratios, cBLM-TU). All models significantly correlated reductions in metal concentrations to increased zooplankton species richness over time (p < 0.01) with a rank based on r 2 values of cBLM-TU > BLM-TU = FI-TU > TM-TU. Lake-wise comparisons within each model showed that the BLM-TU and cBLM-TU models provided the best description of recovery across all seven lakes. These two models were used to calculate thresholds for chemical and biological recovery using data from reference lakes in the same region. A threshold value of TU = 1 derived from the cBLM-TU provided the most accurate description of recovery. Overall, BLM-based TU models that integrate site-specific water chemistry-derived estimates of toxicity offer a useful predictor of biological recovery.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1641-1649
Number of pages9
JournalEnvironmental Science and Technology
Volume46
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 7 2012

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Poisons
ligand
Lakes
zooplankton
species richness
Ligands
lake
modeling
metal
water chemistry
Metals
toxicity
Recovery
Toxicity
ion
Water

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Environmental Chemistry

Cite this

Application of biotic ligand and toxic unit modeling approaches to predict improvements in zooplankton species richness in smelter-damaged lakes near Sudbury, Ontario. / Khan, Farhan R.; Keller, W.; Yan, Norman D.; Welsh, Paul G.; Wood, Chris M.; McGeer, James C.

In: Environmental Science and Technology, Vol. 46, No. 3, 07.02.2012, p. 1641-1649.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Khan, Farhan R. ; Keller, W. ; Yan, Norman D. ; Welsh, Paul G. ; Wood, Chris M. ; McGeer, James C. / Application of biotic ligand and toxic unit modeling approaches to predict improvements in zooplankton species richness in smelter-damaged lakes near Sudbury, Ontario. In: Environmental Science and Technology. 2012 ; Vol. 46, No. 3. pp. 1641-1649.
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